news aggregator

May 21, 2015

22:00
In the last two decades, models from evolutionary biology have made important contributions to demographic research on human fertility change. Within this evolutionary framework, two distinct traditions have focused on different processes of adaptation and time scales of change: (1) behavioral ecological perspectives have focused on how individual fertility decisions are shaped by local ecological circumstances, while (2) cultural evolutionary approaches have emphasized the role of socially transmitted information and changing social norms in shaping fertility behavior. While each tradition has made independent progress, research that integrates these approaches is necessary to improve our understanding of real fertility behavior, which results from a feedback between individual fertility decisions and social change. This approach requires combined attention to immediate ecological determinants of fertility decisions as well as the long-term processes that shape costs and benefits in a given environment. This workshop will bring together an international team of evolutionary behavioral scientists with complementary methodological and theoretical expertise in anthropology, psychology, and demography to develop (a) a synthetic article which proposes how these approaches can be integrated methodologically and theoretically, (b) an empirical article which applies our new synthetic framework to the study of fertility change in a particular fieldsite, demonstrating how the new methodological approach will work in practice and what we can learn through employing it, and (c) a multi-site grant proposal (UK, US, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Poland) aimed at integrating and empirically testing these diverse evolutionary models of human fertility change.
Source: NESCent

May 17, 2015

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 28, 2015

22:00
A number of independent efforts have compiled global plant databases on functionally important traits of leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers. These databases are comprised of 1000's to tens of 1000's of species. With a few notable exceptions, they have not been analyzed in an evolutionary or phylogenetic context. However, when synthesized with a modern molecular phylogeny, these data could tell a comprehensive, multivariate story of the evolution of plant functional diversity. In this working group, we will merge multiple databases to explore the rate (tempo, sensu GG Simpson) of evolution of these traits and the best fit evolutionary model(s) (mode) underlying the trait diversification of land plants. We will ask 1. whether important divergences in trait space occurred along similar branches for different traits, 2. whether there were periods of evolution when trait diversification was especially rapid, and 3. whether there were interactions between trait evolution and rates of speciation and extinction. This work will lead to a new community resource of great interest—an internally synced trait matrix—matched with the current state-of-the-art phylogeny. These data can then be synthesized with fossil evidence to explore whether the tempo and mode of trait evolution in extant and extinct taxa provide similar stories. Furthermore, these data will provide a powerful view into the coordinated (or lack thereof) evolution of ecologically important traits across vascular plants—one of the most diverse and important lineages in the world today.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 18, 2015

March 15, 2015

22:00
NESCent is sponsoring a hackathon to be held at NESCent in Durham, North Carolina, on March 16-20, 2015, with the objective to help foster an interoperating ecosystem of scalable tools and resources for population genetics data analysis in the popular R platform. The event is designed to target interoperability, scalability, and workflow building challenges among the many population genetics R packages that already exist. The gathering provides an opportunity for a diverse group of population genetics researchers, method developers, and people with other relevant areas of expertise to collaborate on code, documentation, use-cases, and other resources that will aid their communities.
Source: NESCent

March 11, 2015

22:00
The potential for synthetic research based on aggregating, integrating, and re-using data is enormous, yet most resources remain interoperable. To realize this potential, software and databases that handle evolutionary trees (and their associated annotations) must be interoperable. Interoperability, in turn, requires tools based on common standards. In the past few years, evolutionary informaticists, with help from NESCent, have been building a software toolbox for solving interoperability problems, based on the EvoIO “stack” of NeXML, CDAO and PhyloWS. This toolbox makes it possible to begin building a worldwide network of interoperable evolutionary resources. The HIP (Hackathons, Interoperability, Phylogenies) aims to use the hackathon mechanism (which we have helped to develop at NESCent) to grow this network directly, by adding links to it, and indirectly, by creating examples for others to follow. To support this project within a working-group budget, we leverage support from strategic partners. Each of the planned series of 3 hackathons will bring together scientific programmers with related challenges. The hackathons target early-career scientists, who often have the most technical expertise and the most potential to pass along their skills and enthusiasm.
Source: NESCent

March 8, 2015

March 5, 2015

03:43
Lab/Field Assistant Job I am a plant biologist at UC Merced looking for at least one full-time summer lab & field assistant. Research in our lab centers on forest ecology & genetics, particularly responses to climate change. The technician appointment would be for four months, with potential for renewal. Starting pay $14.57/hour. Available start dates: April 25-May 30, 2015. Candidates must have a bachelors degree in a biology-related field, good organizational and time management skills, basic computer skills (excel, word processing, etc.), and a drivers license. Candidates must have either: A) Experience with plant genetics, including sequencing, DNA extraction, PCR. Experience developing or working with SNPs would be desirable. B) Forest ecology field experience, including measuring and identifying trees, collecting seed, etc. or C) A mixture of these skills. Additional skills that would be desirable (but not necessarily required) include experience with plant propagation, a working knowledge of statistics, and/or R programming. Please not if you have a drivers license and access to a vehicle. Under-represented minorities are particularly encouraged to apply. Duties may include: - - Developing SNP markers for Ponderosa pine alongside collaborators at Davis - - Locating and setting up field sites in the Sierra Nevada - - Assisting with equipment ordering and testing of protocols in the lab - - Literature searches to find data to parameterize forest models - - Cleaning and maintaining laboratory equipment - - Data entry and analysis The laboratory assistant will also be expected to participate in lab meetings and update his/her skills by reading and participating classes/workshops as necessary. To apply, upload your CV and a cover letter explaining your interest in the position to the UCM AP recruit system (http://bit.ly/ZEghPu, position #5886) or follow this link: http://bit.ly/1B6a7GU. For full consideration, please apply before March 30. For more information, please contact me at emoran5@ucmerced.edu UC Merced is the newest school of the University of California system (http://bit.ly/ZEghPw). The campus is small but diverse. Merced is a town of 80 thousand people located in the central valley, and cost of living is low. It is conveniently located 1 hour north of Fresno (the closest airport), 2 hours east of Berkeley and San Francisco, 2 hours south of Davis and Sacramento, and 2 hours west of Yosemite National Park. Emily Moran, Assistant Professor, UC Merced Emily Moran via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:27
We seek a Research Fellow in Evolutionary Ecology to join the research group of Professor Jane Reid at the University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom. The post is central to a European Research Council-funded project that aims to firstly, build new theory explaining the evolution and persistence of mating systems and reproductive strategies, and secondly, test this theory using more than 20 years of complete life-history and pedigree data from free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The successful applicant will undertake extensive statistical analyses of the long-term song sparrow dataset in order to elucidate patterns of variation in extra-pair reproduction in relation to temporal and spatial variation in population social structure and relatedness. The post-holder will work in close collaboration with Professor Reid, other members of the ERC project team and key international collaborators to undertake appropriate analyses and thereby test key components of evolutionary theory. The post-holder will also have substantial flexibility to develop their own ideas and approaches to the overall problem, potentially including opportunities for fieldwork as well as data analysis. The post provides an exciting opportunity for a highly motivated researcher with expertise in statistical analysis, mating system variation, evolutionary ecology and/or behavioural ecology, and interest in confronting evolutionary theory with data from wild populations. It provides an opportunity to work within a dynamic and successful international research team, with ample opportunities for further international collaboration, high-profile publication and career development (see http://bit.ly/1tNssDf). The post is funded by the European Research Council and will be offered for a period of 2 years. Full details are available at http://bit.ly/1wjiVG1, click on ‘External applicants’ and search under School of Biological Sciences. Closing date is April 1st 2015. The University of Aberdeen is a charity registered in Scotland, No SC013683. Tha Oilthigh Obar Dheathain na charthannas cl?raichte ann an Alba, ?ir. SC013683. “Reid, Dr Jane M.” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:27

The Department of Biology at the University of Virginia invites applications for a postdoctoral Research Associate position in the lab of Dr. Benjamin Blackman. The aims of the position will be tailored to the expertise of the successful applicant and complement the Blackman Lab’s broad interests in the genetic basis of adaptation and domestication, the ecology and evolution of plant development, and mechanisms of organism-environment interaction. Applying tools from evolutionary genomics, molecular genetics, and field ecology in sunflowers (Helianthus) and monkeyflowers (Mimulus), our research addresses the following questions: How do plants cope with daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations? How and why do these responses evolve along environmental gradients? How are multi-trait adaptations assembled over evolutionary time? Current NSF-funded work is focused on following the history and function of sunflower domestication alleles with ancient DNA and gene expression studies as well as the genetics of natural variation in solar tracking. Additional lab and field work in wild sunflowers and monkeyflowers centers on the genetic changes and ecological pressures contributing to clinal variation in developmental plasticity, with an emphasis on responses to seasonal cues. The Research Associate will work closely with the PI, collaborators, and lab personnel to design and lead research in the lab and field. The position also involves preparing grant proposals and manuscripts, data management and dissemination, and mentoring graduate and undergraduate students. The ideal candidate will demonstrate the ability to integrate across biological disciplines, identify and troubleshoot promising new methodologies independently, and use the appointment to develop and pursue novel, exciting questions. Demonstrated expertise in evolutionary genetics, including experience with analysis of genomic or transcriptomic datasets and programming for bioinformatics, is essential. Expertise in selection analysis, QTL mapping, transgene construction and plant transformation, or gene expression studies is desirable. The completion of a PhD degree in Biology or related field by appointment start date is required. Preferred appointment start date is June 2015. This is a one-year appointment; however, appointment may be renewed for an additional two one-year increments, contingent upon available funding and satisfactory performance. To apply, please submit a candidate profile through Jobs@UVA (http://bit.ly/1ccxWRu) and electronically attach: curriculum vitae with list of publications, a cover letter that summarizes research interests and professional goals, and contact information for three (3) references; search on posting number 0615936. Review of applications will begin March 12, 2015; however, the position will remain open until filled. Questions regarding this position should be directed to: Dr. Benjamin Blackman (bkb2f@virginia.edu) Questions regarding the Candidate Profile process or Jobs@UVA should be directed to: Rich Haverstrom (rkh6j@virginia.edu) The University will perform background checks on all new hires prior to making a final offer of employment. The University of Virginia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Benjamin Blackman Department of Biology University of Virginia PO Box 400328 Charlottesville, VA 22904 Tel: 434.924.1930 E-mail: bkb2f@virginia.edu Web: http://bit.ly/1aYcQ6g bkb2f@virginia.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:07

On May 4-6, 2015, the Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine (TriCEM), the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) and the Duke Tropical Conservation Initiative (DTCI) will be hosting a Catalysis Meeting on “Biodiversity, Conservation and Infectious Disease.” The goal of the meeting is to understand how conservation and changes in biodiversity impact infectious disease risk in humans and wildlife. The meeting will be composed of approximately 10 researchers from Research Triangle universities (Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State, and NC Central), with another 25 participants from outside the Triangle. All travel expenses will be covered for non-Triangle participants. In building the participant list, we seek a wide range of interests, approaches, and experience levels. Thus, we welcome modeling approaches, field biologists, and those with expertise in meta-analysis, and graduate students, postdocs, and faculty. At the meeting, we will work toward specific outputs, which will include a special “theme” issue in a high-impact journal that synthesizes diverse views on this important topic, and development of future working groups to investigate specific questions in greater depth. For those wishing to participate in the Catalysis Meeting - including scientists from the Research Triangle Universities - we ask that you fill out a brief application at this link: http://goo.gl/forms/LuCWB5Vhgm via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:07
Job advertisement: The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in Berlin is Germany’s premier wildlife research institute, one of eight research institutes in the Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., a member of the Leibniz Association and jointly funded by the German federal and state governments. The IZW focuses on the life histories and mechanisms of evolutionary adaptations of mammals, their limits and their conservation in natural and anthropogenically influenced environments. The institute operates within the fields of wildlife health and diseases, reproductive biology and medicine, and evolutionary ecology and genetics. The Department of Wildlife Diseases offers (beginning June 1, 2015) a PhD-Position on “Measuring immunogenetic diversity during the Pleistocene” This project will utilize novel next generation sequencing approaches to characterize the evolution of immunogenetic loci over a ca. 50,000 year time span in species with contrasting demographic histories (extinct woolly mammoths and muskoxen).We expect to determine the rate of evolution, persistence and replacement of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) and Major Histocompatibility locus (MHC) alleles for both species which will provide a better understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of the loci that cannot be obtained from examination of modern DNA. Specific tasks include - Development of hybridization capture assays coupled with next generation sequencing for the MHC and TLRs - Bioinformatic and evolutionary genetic analysis of generated data - Logistical coordination of work between Canada, Denmark and Germany Requirements - Diploma or Master of Science in Biology or related fields; - Strong background in evolutionary biology and phylogenetics; - Preference will be given to candidates with ancient DNA or forensic DNA experience; - Preference will also be given to candidates with next generation sequencing experience; - A background in statistics and bioinformatics would be advantageous; - Organizational skills and ability to work in a team; - Part of the project will take place in Canada. Thus, proficiency in English (speaking and writing) is required The position is initially limited to two years, June 1, 2015, with the possibility for extension to a maximum of three years. The reimbursement occurs according to TVöD (65%). The IZW is an equal opportunity employer. Applications from women are strongly encouraged. Preference will be given to disabled applicants with the same qualifications. For further information please contact Prof. Alex Greenwood (e-mail greenwood@izw-berlin.de). Applicants should submit a letter explaining their interests in and particular skills for this position, a CV, copies of relevant degrees and contact details of two people who can provide a reference before April 7th, 2015 via the IZW’s online-job-market (button “Apply online”). Von: personal Gesendet: Mittwoch, 4. März 2015 20:59 An: Vollberg, Stephanie Betreff: evoldir “Vollberg, Stephanie” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:48
Advertisement of vacancy The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in the Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V. (www.izw-berlin.de) together with the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology (FIWI) at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (http://bit.ly/1GmIHjw), the Weierstraß Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics (WIAS, www.wias-berlin.de), the Institut for Virology of the Freie Unversität Berlin (FU, http://bit.ly/17TQXsy) and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB, www.igb-berlin.de) have formed a consortium to implement the AQUAVIR project funded by the Leibniz Association. Water is required for life. We have accumulated evidence suggesting it may be an overlooked viral vector. In climatic zones with seasonally limited precipitation such as east Africa and central Asia, animals congregate at high densities at scarce water sources. We hypothesize that viruses shed in water in this ecological setting would gain a fitness advantage if they evolved traits permitting the retention of their infectivity in water and a reduction in host specificity. The AQUAVIR project will determine whether water is a significant viral vector and how viruses behave mechanistically in such settings, and develop mathematical models to understand the epidemiology and evolution of this phenomenon. We therefore seek to fill the following positions: - 2 doctoral positions in evolutionary disease ecology - 1 postdoc in molecular virology - 1 postdoc in mathematical modeling in epidemiology Specifically: 1 doctoral student in evolutionary disease ecology: African waterholes (05/15) – IZW 1 doctoral student in evolutionary disease ecology: Asian waterholes (06/15) – IZW/FIWI Specific tasks: Determine the distribution, persistence and species usage of water sources; determine the effect of water source characteristics on virus presence; non-invasively determine if physiological stress is correlated with virus excretion in potential host species; analyse environmental DNA of water samples to compare genetic diversity of potential viral host sequence diversity obtained directly from animals compared to their drinking sources. Requirements: Veterinary degree or completed master’s / diploma degree in biological sciences; clean driver’s licence; competence in statistical methods; ability to work independently in challenging environments and to interact with scientists from a wide variety of fields; strong interest in wildlife, conservation and evolutionary biology; a background in ecology, previous experience with wildlife, experience in field research and off-road driving experience would be highly advantageous. Position 05/15 will be supervised by Prof Alex Greenwood (IZW Dept of Wildlife Diseases) and Dr Marion L East (IZW Dept of Evolutionary Ecology), position 06/15 by Prof. Alex Greenwood and Prof. Christian Walzer (FIWI). 1 Postdoc in molecular virology (07/15) – IZW/ FU Specific tasks: Serological analysis of mammalian samples using species-specific viral peptide-based ELISA; next generation sequence characterization of equine herpesviruses from water and animal samples; evolutionary analysis of viral sequences obtained to determine phylogenetic affiliations and estimate evolutionary dynamics of viral populations, including evaluation for positive selection on sequences relevant to virulence or stability in water and/or novel recombination events that might influence viral phenotype; viral mutagenesis to determine whether positively selected sites or recombination events identified in field samples alter viral phenotype, e.g. virulence or stability; coordinate with two field doctoral students and a postdoc mathematical modeller. Requirements: The successful candidate will have a completed doctoral degree, extensive experience in molecular virology, a strong interest in wildlife, conservation and evolutionary biology and interact with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Previous experience in evolutionary biology and next generation sequencing analysis will be considered a major advantage. The postdoc will be supervised by Prof. Alex Greenwood (IZW) and Prof. Nikolaus Osterrieder (FU). 1 Postdoc in mathematical modeling in epidemiology (08/15) – IZW/WIAS Specific tasks: Develop and analyze epidemiological models incorporating water as a viral vector, temporal changes of water sources and interactions between different species; simulate individual-based models in the ecological setting of the project. Requirements: The successful candidate should have a completed doctoral degree and be experienced in epidemiological modeling using probabilistic concepts. Candidates with a strong background in mathematical modeling within other contexts may also apply. The successful applicant will combine probabilistic, analytical and numerical approaches to study the effect of the spatio-temporal variability in the abundance of host and water sources upon the evolution of virulence and other epidemiological outcomes. Good communication skills and a strong interest in evolutionary biology are required as theory will be developed in close collaboration with biologists from IZW and mathematicians from WIAS. The postdoc will be jointly supervised by Drs Stephanie Kramer-Schadt (IZW Department of Evolutionary Ecology), Alex Courtiol (IZW Dept of Evolutionary Genetics) and Prof. W. König (WIAS Research Group 5: Interacting Random Systems). The working location of the candidate could be situated at either IZW, WIAS, or in both institutes. Applications and working environment In our consortium we offer state-of-the-art methodology and a stimulating international research environment within an interdisciplinary, collaborative context. The doctoral positions are initially limited to two years, with the possibility for extension to a maximum of three years. The postdoctoral positions are limited to three years. All positions start on June 1, 2015 at the earliest. Salary is according to TVöD (65% for doctoral students, 100% for postdocs). As a member of the Leibniz Association, and lead institution of the AQUAVIR consortium, the IZW is an equal opportunity employer, determined to increase the proportion of women in successful scientific careers, and particularly encourages women to apply. Preference will be given to disabled applicants with the same qualifications. Enquiries or questions should be directed to Prof. Alex Greenwood, email: greenwood@izw-berlin.de (05-08/15), Dr. Marion East, email: east@izw-berlin.de (05/15), Prof. Chris Walzer, email: Chris.Walzer@vetmeduni.ac.at (06/15), Prof. Nikolaus Osterrieder, email: no.34@fu-berlin.de (07/15), Prof. Wolfgang König, email: koenig@wias-berlin.de (08/15), Dr Stephanie Kramer-Schadt, email: kramer@izw-berlin.de (08/15), or Dr Alexandre Courtiol, email: courtiol@izw-berlin.de (08/15). Please email complete application documents as a single pdf-file including the position reference number, a letter of motivation, CV, copies of relevant degrees, and names and contact details of two referees as soon as possible but no later than March 20, 2015 via the IZW’s online-job-market (button “Apply owww.izw-berlin.de) together with the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology (FIWI) at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (http://bit.ly/1GmIHjw), the Weierstraß Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics (WIAS, www.wias-berlin.de), the Institut for Virology of the Freie Unversität Berlin (FU, http://bit.ly/17TQXsy) and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB, www.igb-berlin.de) have formed a consortium to implement the AQUAVIR project funded by the Leibniz Association. Water is required for life. We have accumulated evidence suggesting it may be an overlooked viral vector. In climatic zones with seasonally limited precipitation such as east Africa and central Asia, animals congregate at high densities at scarce water sources. We hypothesize that viruses shed in water in this ecological setting would gain a fitness advantage if they evolved traits permitting the retention of their infectivity in water and a reduction in host specificity. The AQUAVIR project will determine whether water is a significant viral vector and how viruses behave mechanistically in such settings, and develop mathematical models to understand the epidemiology and evolution of this phenomenon. We therefore seek to fill the following positions: - 2 doctoral positions in evolutionary disease ecology - 1 postdoc in molecular virology - 1 postdoc in mathematical modeling in epidemiology Specifically: 1 doctoral student in evolutionary disease ecology: African waterholes (05/15) – IZW 1 doctoral student in evolutionary disease ecology: Asian waterholes (06/15) – IZW/FIWI Specific tasks: Determine the distribution, persistence and species usage of water sources; determine the effect of water source characteristics on virus presence; non-invasively determine if physiological stress is correlated with virus excretion in potential host species; analyse environmental DNA of water samples to compare genetic diversity of potential viral host sequence diversity obtained directly from animals compared to their drinking sources. Requirements: Veterinary degree or completed master’s / diploma degree in biological sciences; clean driver’s licence; competence in statistical methods; ability to work independently in challenging environments and to interact with scientists from a wide variety of fields; strong interest in wildlife, conservation and evolutionary biology; a background in ecology, previous experience with wildlife, experience in field research and off-road driving experience would be highly advantageous. Position 05/15 will be supervised by Prof Alex Greenwood (IZW Dept of Wildlife Diseases) and Dr Marion L East (IZW Dept of Evolutionary Ecology), position 06/15 by Prof. Alex Greenwood and Prof. Christian Walzer (FIWI). 1 Postdoc in molecular virology (07/15) – IZW/ FU Specific tasks: Serological analysis of mammalian samples using species-specific viral peptide-based ELISA; next generation sequence characterization of equine herpesviruses from water and animal samples; evolutionary analysis of viral sequences obtained to determine phylogenetic affiliations and estimate evolutionary dynamics of viral populations, including evaluation for positive selection on sequences relevant to virulence or stability in water and/or novel recombination events that might influence viral phenotype; viral mutagenesis to determine whether positively selected sites or recombination events identified in field samples alter viral phenotype, e.g. virulence or stability; coordinate with two field doctoral students and a postdoc mathematical modeller. Requirements: The successful candidate will have a completed doctoral degree, extensive experience in molecular virology, a strong interest in wildlife, conservation and evolutionary biology and interact with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Previous experience in evolutionary biology and next generation sequencing analysis will be considered a major advantage. The postdoc will be supervised by Prof. Alex Greenwood (IZW) and Prof. Nikolaus Osterrieder (FU). 1 Postdoc in mathematical modeling in epidemiology (08/15) – IZW/WIAS Specific tasks: Develop and analyze epidemiological models incorporating water as a viral vector, temporal changes of water sources and interactions between different species; simulate individual-based models in the ecological setting of the project. Requirements: The successful candidate should have a completed doctoral degree and be experienced in epidemiological modeling using probabilistic concepts. Candidates with a strong background in mathematical modeling within other contexts may also apply. The successful applicant will combine probabilistic, analytical and numerical approaches to study the effect of the spatio-temporal variability in the abundance of host and water sources upon the evolution of virulence and other epidemiological outcomes. Good communication skills and a strong interest in evolutionary biology are required as theory will be developed in close collaboration with biologists from IZW and mathematicians from WIAS. The postdoc will be jointly supervised by Drs Stephanie Kramer-Schadt (IZW Department of Evolutionary Ecology), Alex Courtiol (IZW Dept of Evolutionary Genetics) and Prof. W. König (WIAS Research Group 5: Interacting Random Systems). The working location of the candidate could be situated at either IZW, WIAS, or in both institutes. Applications and working environment In our consortium we offer state-of-the-art methodology and a stimulating international research environment within an interdisciplinary, collaborative context. The doctoral positions are initially limited to two years, with the possibility for extension to a maximum of three years. The postdoctoral positions are limited to three years. All positions start on June 1, 2015 at the earliest. Salary is according to TVöD (65% for doctoral students, 100% for postdocs). As a member of the Leibniz Association, and lead institution of the AQUAVIR consortium, the IZW is an equal opportunity employer, determined to increase the proportion of women in successful scientific careers, and particularly encourages women to apply. Preference will be given to disabled applicants with the same qualifications. Enquiries or questions should be directed to Prof. Alex Greenwood, email: greenwood@izw-berlin.de (05-08/15), Dr. Marion East, email: east@izw-berlin.de (05/15), Prof. Chris Walzer, email: Chris.Walzer@vetmeduni.ac.at (06/15), Prof. Nikolaus Osterrieder, email: no.34@fu-berlin.de (07/15), Prof. Wolfgang König, email: koenig@wias-berlin.de (08/15), Dr Stephanie Kramer-Schadt, email: kramer@izw-berlin.de (08/15), or Dr Alexandre Courtiol, email: courtiol@izw-berlin.de (08/15). Please email complete application documents as a single pdf-file including the position reference number, a letter of motivation, CV, copies of relevant degrees, and names and contact details of two referees as soon as possible but no later than March 20, 2015 via the IZW’s online-job-market (button “Apply online”). Stephanie Vollberg Personalsachbearbeiterin Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW) Alfred-Kowalke-Str. 17 10315 Berlin (Friedrichsfelde) Tel. 030- 5168 107 Fax. 030-5126 104 vollberg@izw-berlin.de www.izw-berlin.de P Please consider the environment before printing this email! “Vollberg, Stephanie” via Gmail
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*Post Doctoral position in epigenetics and genome stability, Lyon* We are welcoming applications from enthusiastic and independent post-doctoral candidates to participate in our FRM grant-funded project related to epigenetics and genome stability. The fellowship is for 2 years and should start before June 2015. Applications are accepted until the end of March. *Background* Genomic stability can be disturbed by the activity of repeated sequences such as transposable elements (TEs). Epigenetic mechanisms allow the silencing of these sequences. As a consequence, the presence of TEs in a genome may affect the chromatin structure of the regions in which they are inserted. Environmental factors have also been described as affecting genome stability, namely by affecting the rate of transposition„ and could be associated with environment related diseases such as cancer. ** *Project* The purpose of the project is to establish the link between TEs, environment and epigenetics. Drosophila is one of the best-fitted model for this project since we have an easy access to Drosophila natural variability, the species genome is small and harbors low amounts of TEs, and it is easily manipulated in the lab. The project consists in the analysis of Drosophila responses to stress by analyzing chromatin structure, piRNA abundances and mRNA levels, with an emphasis on TEs. *Candidates* The applicants are expected to have a strong background in epigenetics with a confirmed interest in genomics and evolutionary biology. Skills in data analysis and/or bioinformatics are necessary, but the candidate will benefit from the LBBE bioinformatics and statistical environment. The ideal candidate should be highly motivated, curious and enthusiastic to work in a collaborative team. Proven ability to identify research objectives and meet agreed deadlines, self-motivation and flexibility are essential. Excellent written and oral skills in English are required. *Environment* The host laboratory (LBBE, http://bit.ly/1f4ek5e) is a stimulating, cosmopolitan and pleasant place to work, where one can meet biologists, computer scientists, mathematicians and statisticians working on problems that range from ecology to medicine, through genomics and evolution. Lyon is the second largest city in France, is famous for its food, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and enjoys a very convenient central location in Europe. Please send one PDF file to Cristina Vieira cristina.vieira@univ-lyon1.fr including: - a cover letter - a concise summary of previous research activities (2 pages max) - a curriculum vitae including publication list - contact details for 2-3 referees via Gmail
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NOTE: Updated job description and start dates below. Two postdoctoral research positions funded by the United States Department of Agriculture are available to work with Dr. Katrina Dlugosch ( http://bit.ly/LzSdpW) and Dr. David Baltrus ( http://bit.ly/1CrC9t6) at the University of Arizona on the ecological genomics of adaptation of resource allocation and microbial interactions in the invasive plant yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis). We are investigating the evolution of resource allocation and species interactions during range expansion and the impact of evolution on the spread of invading populations, and we are seeking postdoctoral researchers with interests and experience in these areas. One successful candidate will be responsible for next-generation genomic sequence generation and bioinformatic analyses, particularly by 1) analyzing metagenomic surveys of plant-associated microbial communities and 2) quantifying rates of gene flow across the genome in invading plant populations using a high-throughput RADseq next-generation approach. Additional opportunities will be available for the pursuit of related projects of interest to the candidate. Preferred start date in late 2015. To apply, submit a statement of interest and curriculum vitae to job #57623 at http://bit.ly/1mVZX4x A second successful candidate will be responsible for 1) mapping QTL associated with the genetic basis of variation in resistance to bacterial pathogens using large-scale greenhouse experiments and genome-wide RADseq markers, and 2) quantifying population-level impacts of infection using phenotypic data collection in combination with existing demographic models in collaboration with Dr. Sarah Swope (Mills College). Additional opportunities will be available for the pursuit of related projects of interest to the candidate. Preferred start date in late 2015 or early 2016. To apply, submit a statement of interest and curriculum vitae to job #57624 at http://bit.ly/1mVZX4x Positions are for one year, with reappointment for up to two additional years subject to satisfactory performance. Positions are open until filled. Minimum qualifications *PhD in Biology or a related field *Authorship of peer-reviewed publications of research in a field related to the position *Strong communication skills *Ability to work independently and in a team Preferred Qualifications (Applicants without these skills will be considered): *Experience producing and analyzing molecular genetic data, particularly next-generation genomic data *Experience culturing bacterial colonies *Experience rearing plants under standard greenhouse conditions *Experience collecting and documenting field specimens Inquiries about the positions may be directed to Dr. Katrina Dlugosch ( kdlugosch@email.arizona.edu). via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR