news aggregator

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 15, 2015

February 26, 2015

22:00
Evolutionary biology is a foundational and integrative science for medicine, but few physicians or medical researchers are familiar with its most relevant principles. While undergraduate students have increasing opportunities to learn about the interface of evolution, health, and disease, most premedical students have scant room for electives in their schedules, few premed prerequisite courses incorporate evolutionary thinking, and no medical school develops these competencies. The overarching goal of this Working Group is to lay the groundwork for future endeavors by providing testable models and pathways for infusing premedical and medical education with evolutionary thinking. This Working Group, an interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational group of physicians, scientists, educators, and students, will 1) define core competencies in evolutionary biology for physicians and other health professionals; 2) investigate the ability of current curricula to prepare health professionals to meet these standards; 3) identify “teachable moments” that provide opportunities to integrate evolutionary principles into premedical and medical curricula; 4) design model curricula and learning experiences that can advance evolutionary education for health professionals; and 5) provide open access to these resources and disseminate them. The Working Group will be supported by an Advisory Committee of senior academic leaders and stakeholders. These efforts will not be sufficient in themselves, but they will establish the intellectual platform from which educational interventions on student learning, and scientific and clinical problem solving, can be developed and tested.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Americans are far less accepting of human evolution than other realms of evolution; yet, human evolution and our common ancestry with other animals are increasingly relevant to medicine and our daily lives. We propose a NESCent working group made up of scientists, educators, and a journalist that will be devoted to enhancing communication of these health-related applications of human evolution to diverse audiences. Planned activities include discussion of methodological approaches designed to best communicate these ideas, design of teacher workshops, writing publications geared to each of these audiences, and discussion regarding collaboration with museums (in particular, the Smithsonian Institution) and zoos. In these activities, we will take a systematic scholarly approach using evidence-based methods to foster communication of principles of human evolution to these diverse audiences.
Source: NESCent

February 22, 2015

22:00
It is easily demonstrable that organisms with rapid, appropriate plastic responses to environmental change will prevail over genotypes with fixed phenotypes. It is also accepted that the general dearth of organisms successful across a wide environmental range indicates fundamental limits to or costs of plasticity. The nature of constraining factors has been broadly discussed (DeWitt et al. 1998), and numerous studies have been done to quantify them. However, a curious pattern has emerged: although hypothesized to be widespread, costs are absent more often than they are detected. The issue of costs of plasticity (CoP) lies at the intersection of a range of evolutionary and ecological questions: What are the limits to plasticity? Are CoP associated with life history tradeoffs? Are CoP expected in all environments? Does plasticity enhance invasiveness? etc. This working group will address two fundamental questions. 1) Are the expectations that costs of plasticity should be universal well-founded (i.e., the “no free lunch” principle)? Several authors have proposed that, in situations where the intensity of selection for adaptive plasticity is strong, there should be corresponding pressure to ameliorate costs. 2) Independently of the answer to the first question, Are analytical and experimental methods for detecting CoP appropriate or sufficiently sensitive? CoP have most often been studied using common garden style plasticity experiments and analyzed via van Tienderen’s (1991) multiple regression approach.
Source: NESCent

February 10, 2015

22:00
Meta-analysis is a statistical technique used for syntheses of results from numerous independent studies. Increasingly, evolutionary biologists need to perform meta-analysis in which the effects of numerous explanatory variables on a response variable of interest are considered, taking into account the evolutionary history of the species in the dataset. However, such analyses require analysis of numerous complex statistical models, and methods for such analyses have not been previously developed. Our working group is developing these methods and applying them to understand local adaptation, context-dependency, and the influence of evolutionary relationships on outcomes of symbiosis between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.
Source: NESCent

January 14, 2015

22:00
When a seed germinates determines the seasonal environment experienced by a plant throughout its life, and germination phenology is one of the very first phenotypes expressed by plants during ontogeny. As such, germination phenology is subject to extremely strong natural selection, especially during early stages of adaptation. Moreover, germination co-evolves with seed dispersal, mating system, and reproductive strategy to determine plant life cycles and demographic dynamics of plant populations. This working group will test the importance of germination adaptations in delimiting species niche and range limits, both in the past and in response to changed environments. More generally, this topic pertains to the identification of key traits associated with adaptation to environmental change, and the role that early life-stage traits and traits associated with habitat selection contribute to these dynamics. The focus on germination provides a clear and tractable system for addressing general evolutionary and ecological questions concerning the interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, trait coevolution, and the roles of habitat selection and organismal responses to their environment in niche evolution. It also will contribute tangibly to efforts to predict plant responses to environmental change. The group will compile and analyze a comprehensive data set on germination and dormancy, combined with data on niche breadth, geographic range, and life history, in order to test hypotheses concerning trait coevolution and species range limits. The group will also theoretically explore interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, theoretically model trait coevolution via habitat selection and bet hedging, and develop phenological models of integrated life histories that include germination in order to predict plant responses to environmental change.
Source: NESCent

January 13, 2015

22:00
Humans are vulnerable to a number of unique musculoskeletal maladies as a consequence of our evolutionary history. Although walking on our extended hind limbs is the hallmark adaptation characterizing our species it nevertheless makes us vulnerable to a wide range of serious joint and soft tissue problems. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective many of these medical issues become understandable and, indeed, novel methods of diagnosis and treatment can emerge. The proposed collaborative, a working group of paleoanthropologists, comparative anatomists, biomechanical engineers, and physicians will create new analytical approaches and new ways of viewing the disorders that uniquely plague our species. The results of this work include the development and implementation of a model curriculum, the creation of a website, and the publication of an edited volume. The disorders directly related to our way of walking include chronically sprained ankles, hernias, osteoporotic fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm, obstetric problems, knee problems, foot disorders, fatigue fractures, and many others. By understanding how our anatomy changed in order to walk upright, and why these changes occurred, we gain a better understanding of why these adaptations sometimes go awry resulting in disorders and pain.
Source: NESCent

December 17, 2014

22:00
We propose a catalysis meeting to advance theoretically-grounded, empirical study of scientific collaborations designed to achieve synthesis. Synthesis is the integration of diverse theories, methods and data across spatial or temporal scales, scientific phenomena, and forms of expertise to increase the generality, parsimony, applicability, or empirical soundness of scientific explanations. It generates emergent explanations beyond the scope of any one discipline, dataset or method. It counterbalances scientific specialization, capitalizes on existing data, and can be used to address complex problems. Synthesis centers are an increasingly vital component of science policy, rising in number, size, and prominence nationally and globally. Despite this, our understanding of synthesis-group collaborations and their performance are inadequate to advance knowledge, inform policy and guide practice. This meeting will draw together scientists who lead and conduct synthetic research with a diverse group of experts on scientific collaboration and research evaluation. Our aim is to advance understanding of synthesis and develop new approaches for investigating it empirically, longitudinally and comparatively.
Source: NESCent

December 9, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

December 7, 2014

22:00
Making science more reproducible has enormous potential to accelerate scientific advance, including for practicing individuals. Despite this, the tools and approaches that are already available are rarely taught. To address this, we are organizing a 4-day workshop aimed at developing, and later teaching, a short course curriculum for tools, resources, and practices for reproducible science. A part of the workshop will also be devoted to addressing gaps that hinder the broad adoption of such resources.
Source: NESCent

December 2, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 26, 2014

02:43
Asst. or Assoc. Professor, Plant Quantitative Genetics University of California, Riverside Department of Botany and Plant Sciences We are seeking an assistant/associate professor in quantitative genetics with a focus on genetic improvement of agricultural crop populations, including exploitation of wild relatives. Research may include development of statistical methods integrating genomic and phenotypic information that address both additive and non-additive genetic variation, methodologies to discover and exploit dominance and epistatic effects as genomic predictors, methods of enhancing the accuracy of genomic predictors across populations, and expanding methodologies for the analysis of complex traits using high-density markers in combination with phenotypic data. This position will include an appointment in the Agricultural Experiment Station, which carries a responsibility to conduct research and outreach relevant to the mission of the California Agricultural Experiment Station (http://bit.ly/1cKvnDJ). The title and rank is open to either an Assistant or an Associate Professor. Appointment level and salary will be competitive, commensurate with accomplishments. The successful candidate will have a faculty appointment in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences (BPSC) at the University of California, Riverside, California. The position will deepen the department’s established strength in quantitative genetics and plant breeding and provide expertise in statistical genetics and genomics. The BPSC Department is a vibrant, interdisciplinary research community, with faculty working across areas of basic to applied plant sciences. A Ph.D. degree with emphasis in quantitative genetics and strong training in statistics is required. Postdoctoral and/or independent research experience is greatly preferred, especially in genome-wide association analysis, with ability to integrate high-density genotype data sets to identify genetic variation that influences complex traits and understanding of theoretical and computational methodologies used in the analysis of quantitative and molecular data for genetic prediction. Programming skills with multiple computer languages are desired. The candidate is expected to develop vigorous research and teaching programs, which are demonstrated with publications in refereed journals, extramural funding, and supervision of graduate students and post-doctoral associates. The candidate should have demonstrated experience in conducting research, strong written and oral communication skills, and a desire to work in a team environment to further strengthen collaborative links with multiple departments in the College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences at UCR. Research may focus on any crop. The appointee will be welcome to engage in research utilizing established UCR germplasm collections in various crops including citrus, avocado, wheat, and cowpea. Teaching responsibilities will include graduate and undergraduate level courses that fit the expertise and interests of the successful candidate and departmental needs. Applicants for the Assistant level should submit a curriculum vitae, a statement of research, a statement of teaching interests, and have four letters of recommendation submitted through http://bit.ly/1yb2pZ6. Applicants for the Associate level, should submit a curriculum vitae, a statement of research, a statement of teaching interests, and provide names and e-mail addresses of four references through http://bit.ly/1CeLRV6. Inquiries should be directed to the search committee chair, Shizhong Xu (shizhong.xu@ucr.edu). Review of applications will begin on January 19, 2015 and will continue until the position is filled. Websites: http://bit.ly/155ceHR , http://bit.ly/1cKvnDN and http://www.ucr.edu The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. In accordance with Federal law, we are making available our Campus Security Report to all prospective employees. Lisa Dunmore via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:14
Talented Ph.D. Students Wanted! Ecology and evolution of plants and plant-animal interactions My lab is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of plants, often focusing on plant-animal interactions such as herbivory, seed predation, pollination, and seed dispersal. We use a combination of field, greenhouse, phylogenetic, experimental evolution, and molecular genetic approaches. Students are expected to develop their own independent projects, but will also have opportunities to collaborate on NSF-funded investigations of hybridization in wild sunflowers and the role of genetic diversity in invasions. The lab is also starting new projects in desert and alpine ecosystems at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge and the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab. Students will be a part of a dynamic group of plant biology, ecology, and evolution researchers at UNM. For more info please contact me (and send along a CV including GPA and GRE scores): Ken Whitney Department of Biology University of New Mexico Websites: http://bit.ly/18ag9U4 http://bit.ly/H9Wjmg Email: whitneyk@unm.edu Kenneth Whitney via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:58
Three-year post-doctoral position at the Institute of Computational Biology (IBC), Montpellier (France) : Methodological developments in evolutionary genomics. One young investigator position opens immediately at the Institute for Computational Biology (IBC, http://bit.ly/1xBTByk) of Montpellier (France) to work on the development of innovative inference methods and software in population genomics or phylogenetics to analyze large-scale genomic data in the fields of health, agronomy and environment (Work Package 2 evolutionary genomics of the IBC). The candidate will develop its own research on some of the following topics : selective processes, demographic history, spatial genetic processes, very large phylogenies reconstruction, gene/species tree reconciliation, using maximum likelihood, bayesian and simulation-based inference. We are seeking a candidate with a strong background in mathematical and computational evolutionary biology, with interest in applications and software development. The successfull candidate will work on his own project, build in collaboration with any researchers* involved in the WP2 project and working at the IBC labs (AGAP, CBGP, ISEM, I3M, LIRMM, MIVEGEC). IBC hires young investigators, typically with a PhD plus some post-doc experience, a high level of publishing, strong communication abilities, and a taste for multidisciplinary research. Working full-time at IBC, these young researchers will play a key role in Institute life. Most of their time will be devoted to scientific projects. In addition, they are expected to actively participate in the coordination of workpackages, in the hosting of foreign researchers and in the organization of seminars and events (summer schools, conferences…). In exchange, these young researchers will benefit from an exceptional environment thanks to the presence of numerous leading international researchers, not to mention significant autonomy for their work. Montpellier hosts one of the most vibrant communities of biodiversity research in Europe with several research centers of excellence in the field. This positions is open for up to 3 years with a salary above the French post-doc standard. Living at Montpellier: http://bit.ly/1rsnOrN Contacts WP2 Evolutionary Genetics  : Jean-Michel Marin : http://bit.ly/1ATaNjw Franois Rousset : http://bit.ly/1rsnOrR Vincent Ranwez : http://bit.ly/1ATaNjy Olivier Gascuel : http://bit.ly/1rsnOrT Submit my application : http://bit.ly/1ATaMfp * WP2 researchers : Vincent Berry, Franc?ois Chevenet, Jean-Franc?ois Dufayard, Olivier Gascuel, Mathieu Gautier, Raphal Leblois, Jean-Michel Marin, Miguel Navascue?s, Fabio Pardi, Martine Peeters, Pierre Pudlo, Vincent Ranwez, Franois Rousset, Ce?line Scornavacca, Renaud Vitalis. Raphael Leblois via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:58
Dear evoldir A PhD studentship starting October 2015 is available by competition to study the role of genomic imprinting in social insect biology, jointly supervised by me (Dr Eamonn Mallon ebm3@le.ac.uk) and Dr. Ezio Rosato at the University of Leicester. Further details at http://bit.ly/1bRFqnL Project outline: This project will attempt to establish the role of genomic imprinting in the important pollinator species, the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Genomic imprinting is the differential expression of alleles in diploid individuals, with the expression being dependent upon the sex of the parent from which it was inherited. Genomic imprinting is an important area of research in plant breeding and in evolutionary biology and has relevance to some human cancers and developmental syndromes. Bees are potentially a model for genomic imprinting because theyhave a small, sparsely methylated genome. The PhD student will carry out all experiments and bioinformatic analysis under the guidance of the supervisory team. They will be provided with training in R, a powerful and increasing popular statistical programming language, Python, a general-purpose, high-level programming language widely used in bioinformatics, molecular biology, RNA-seq, anatomical dissection and neuroanatomy, in situ hybridisation, confocal microscopy and bee husbandry as required. References Amarasinghe, H. E., Clayton, C. I. & Mallon, E. B. (2014) Methylation and worker reproduction in the bumble-bee(Bombus terrestris). Proc. R. Soc. B Biol. Sci. 281, 20132502 Yan et al (2014) Eusocial insects as emerging models for behavioural epigenetics. Nat Rev Genet advance online publication. This project is available for a PhD studentship is available as part of the Midlands Integrative Biosciences Training Partnership, http://bit.ly/1C9m94x Eligibility: British nationals who have lived in the UK all their lives are eligible. Also eligible are non-British nationals who have settled status AND have been resident in the UK for 3 years immediately prior to the date of the start of the course. EU nationals who have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for three years immediately prior to the date of start of the course; EU nationals not resident in the UK are eligible for matched funding studentships. To apply formally please see http://bit.ly/1rsnR6V. Application deadline the 31/1/2015 Please contact me (ebm3@le.ac.uk) if you would like to discuss the project informally Dr Eamonn Mallon Lecturer in Evolutionary Biology Room 220 Department of Biology University of Leicester LE1 7RH UK Tel 01162523488 Email ebm3@le.ac.uk “Mallon, Eamonn B. (Dr.)” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:26
PhD position: Genetic incompatibility and mate choice in parasitoid wasps - A182/14 - A PhD position is available for 3 years (payment 50% TV-L E13) in the population ecology and evolutionary ecology group, headed by Prof. Dr. Thomas S. Hoffmeister, at the University of Bremen, Germany. The University of Bremen comprises 19,000 students and supports a broad range of academic disciplines. The ambition and success of its research strategy is reflected in its being one of eleven universities, selected within the German “Excellence Initiative”. Project outline: Allelic incompatibility between individuals of the same species should select for mate choice based on the genetic make-up of both partners at loci that influence offspring fitness. Therefore, mate choice may be an important driver of allelic diversity. A complementary sex determination (CSD) system is responsible for intraspecific allelic incompatibility in many species of ants, bees, and wasps. CSD may thus favour disassortative mating and in this, resembles the MHC of the vertebrate immune system, or the self-incompatibility (SI) system of higher plants. The aim of this project is to analyse mate choice behaviour in the parasitic wasp Bracon brevicornis (Hymenoptera, Braconidae), thereby disentangling the impact of indirect (kin recognition) and direct (allele recognition) influences of the genetic composition of mating partners. The project will focus on proximate and ultimate cues of mating preferences alike and consist of fieldwork as well as laboratory experiments and molecular work. There is flexibility in the programme and the precise direction and emphasis of the project will be determined by collaboration between the student and the supervisors. Applicants must have a master’s degree, or equivalent, in a relevant subject, e.g. ecology, animal behaviour, entomology and/or evolutionary biology. We expect an excellent knowledge of the English language in both writing and speaking. The successful candidate will receive high quality training in all relevant skills, conduct innovative research in a lively and active research group, and participate in teaching activities at the BSc or MSc level. The University of Bremen has received a number of awards for its diversity policies and offers a family friendly working environment. We strive to increase the number of international researchers and particularly solicit applications from suitably qualified candidates. Applications from female candidates and applications of academics with a migration background are explicitly welcome. Disabled persons with the same professional and personal qualifications will be given preference. Applications should be sent include a scan of the Master’s diploma, a transcript of records, a CV, and a short proposal explaining how the applicant would approach the project, including specific hypotheses (maximum 1 page including references). Two potential researchers should be mentioned in the cover letter who are willing to supply letters of reference. Applications should be sent by email in a single pdf to Mrs. Inae Kim-Frommherz (inaekf@uni-bremen.de) until 31.12.2014 Informal inquiries to the position can be directed to Dr. Andra Thiel (thiel@uni-bremen.de). Inae Kim-Frommherz via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:26
The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York is inviting applications for an assistant curatorial position in the Division of Vertebrate Zoology, Department of Herpetology. This is a tenure track position with the salary and duration of review for tenure being negotiable depending on the candidate ‘s professional experience and accomplishment. We seek candidates whose research addresses fundamental questions involving the systematics and evolutionary biology of living amphibians and/or reptiles. The successful candidate will have an accomplished record of scholarship and publication as well as capabilities for leadership within the Division and Department. Candidates who can contribute to Museum initiatives in genomics, phenomics (large-scale phenotypic analysis), and to the global exploration of amphibian and/or reptile diversity are especially encouraged to apply. Collection and/or field-based research and demonstration of completed published research and grantsmanship are highly desirable. The ability to communicate effectively within the scholarly community and to a larger public is important. AMNH curators are expected to maintain a high level of productivity in original research, to provide curatorial oversight of relevant collections, and to develop a competitive research program for extramural funding. Other responsibilities may include serving on committees and participating in Museum-sponsored exhibits and educational programs, and in the Comparative Biology Ph.D. program at the Richard Gilder Graduate School of AMNH. Candidates should have postdoctoral or professional employment experience. Interested candidates should submit electronically, via a single email message, the following materials (the first three combined into a single PDF): a) complete curriculum vitae, b) a statement detailing research interests, accomplishments, future research plans, and how you envision contributing to the Department of Herpetology and to graduate and postgraduate research and education, c) a list of dissertation advisors, committee members, co-authors, and co-PIs on funded grants during the preceding five years, and d) up to five relevant publications (pdf files). In addition, each applicant should have three letters of support sent to the Search Committee. All materials should be submitted electronically to: Herpetology Search Committee, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192, to: jlc@amnh.org (Subject line: Herpetology Search Committee: your name). Inquires should be directed to Joel Cracraft, Chair of the Search Committee: jlc@amnh.org. Applications and letters of support should be received no later than January 10, 2015. Employer Information: The American Museum of Natural History is one of the world’s preeminent scientific and cultural institutions. Since its founding in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world and the universe through a wide-ranging program of scientific research, education and exhibition. The Museum has one of the largest vertebrate collections in the world and is nearly completely digitized. The collection of the Department of Herpetology is globally significant. The Department has access to molecular genetic facilities that can support an active graduate and postdoctoral training program. The American Museum of Natural History is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. The Museum does not discriminate due to age, sex, religion, race, color, national origin, disability, marital status, veteran status, sexual orientation, or any other factor prohibited by law. Qualified candidates of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds are encouraged to apply for vacant positions at all levels. If special accommodations are needed in applying for this position, please contact the Office of Human Resources at hrdesk@amnh.org or 212-768-5108. Joel Cracraft Chair, Division of Vertebrate Zoology Lamont Curator and Curator-in-Charge Department of Ornithology American Museum of Natural History Central Park West at 79th Street New York, New York 10024 Phone: (212) 769-5633 Fax: (212) 769-5759 e-mail: JLC@amnh.org cracraft@amnh.org Professor, Richard Gilder Graduate School, AMNH Adjunct Professor, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York Adjunct Professor of Biology, City University of New York, New York Joel L Cracraft via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR