news aggregator

January 13, 2015

22:00
Humans are vulnerable to a number of unique musculoskeletal maladies as a consequence of our evolutionary history. Although walking on our extended hind limbs is the hallmark adaptation characterizing our species it nevertheless makes us vulnerable to a wide range of serious joint and soft tissue problems. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective many of these medical issues become understandable and, indeed, novel methods of diagnosis and treatment can emerge. The proposed collaborative, a working group of paleoanthropologists, comparative anatomists, biomechanical engineers, and physicians will create new analytical approaches and new ways of viewing the disorders that uniquely plague our species. The results of this work include the development and implementation of a model curriculum, the creation of a website, and the publication of an edited volume. The disorders directly related to our way of walking include chronically sprained ankles, hernias, osteoporotic fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm, obstetric problems, knee problems, foot disorders, fatigue fractures, and many others. By understanding how our anatomy changed in order to walk upright, and why these changes occurred, we gain a better understanding of why these adaptations sometimes go awry resulting in disorders and pain.
Source: NESCent

December 17, 2014

22:00
We propose a catalysis meeting to advance theoretically-grounded, empirical study of scientific collaborations designed to achieve synthesis. Synthesis is the integration of diverse theories, methods and data across spatial or temporal scales, scientific phenomena, and forms of expertise to increase the generality, parsimony, applicability, or empirical soundness of scientific explanations. It generates emergent explanations beyond the scope of any one discipline, dataset or method. It counterbalances scientific specialization, capitalizes on existing data, and can be used to address complex problems. Synthesis centers are an increasingly vital component of science policy, rising in number, size, and prominence nationally and globally. Despite this, our understanding of synthesis-group collaborations and their performance are inadequate to advance knowledge, inform policy and guide practice. This meeting will draw together scientists who lead and conduct synthetic research with a diverse group of experts on scientific collaboration and research evaluation. Our aim is to advance understanding of synthesis and develop new approaches for investigating it empirically, longitudinally and comparatively.
Source: NESCent

December 9, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

December 2, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 21, 2014

November 18, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 17, 2014

22:00
What are the limits of adaptation? What determines long-term evolutionary rates? How predictable is evolution? The field of experimental evolution has grown tremendously over the last decade. This growth reflects both a greater appreciation of the power of experimental evolution for testing evolutionary hypotheses and, especially recently, the new power of genomic methods for analyzing changes in experimentally evolved lineages. But most experiments are fairly short, typically lasting only a few tens or hundreds of generations in plants/animals or microbes, respectively. Long-term evolution experiments are still rare, but are crucial in gaining a better understanding of evolutionary processes and outcomes, and in answering some of the most important basic and applied questions in biology. This catalysis meeting will bring together leading researchers in experimental evolution, population genetics, molecular evolution, theory and many other fields to develop a roadmap for the future of long-term evolution experiments. The meeting’s aims are: (i) To identify the most important biological questions that can be addressed using long-term evolution experiments; (ii) To synthesise information on existing long-term evolution experiments that were both intentional (e.g. lab-based) and unintentional (e.g. disease outbreaks, the pet trade, stock centres, and industrial processes); (iii) To identify opportunities to answer existing questions with existing data and/or experiments; (iv) To plan new long-term evolution experiments in a variety of systems; This meeting will establish an international network of collaborating labs that will result in new research directions, new training opportunities, and a grand vision for the future of long-term evolution experiments.
Source: NESCent

November 12, 2014

22:00
In the last two decades, models from evolutionary biology have made important contributions to demographic research on human fertility change. Within this evolutionary framework, two distinct traditions have focused on different processes of adaptation and time scales of change: (1) behavioral ecological perspectives have focused on how individual fertility decisions are shaped by local ecological circumstances, while (2) cultural evolutionary approaches have emphasized the role of socially transmitted information and changing social norms in shaping fertility behavior. While each tradition has made independent progress, research that integrates these approaches is necessary to improve our understanding of real fertility behavior, which results from a feedback between individual fertility decisions and social change. This approach requires combined attention to immediate ecological determinants of fertility decisions as well as the long-term processes that shape costs and benefits in a given environment. This workshop will bring together an international team of evolutionary behavioral scientists with complementary methodological and theoretical expertise in anthropology, psychology, and demography to develop (a) a synthetic article which proposes how these approaches can be integrated methodologically and theoretically, (b) an empirical article which applies our new synthetic framework to the study of fertility change in a particular fieldsite, demonstrating how the new methodological approach will work in practice and what we can learn through employing it, and (c) a multi-site grant proposal (UK, US, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Poland) aimed at integrating and empirically testing these diverse evolutionary models of human fertility change.
Source: NESCent

November 11, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 9, 2014

22:00
This catalysis group will plan the implementation of SimBank, a large, openly-available series of population genetic landscape simulations, intended for easy testing and validation of statistical genetics methods and based on realistic scenarios from natural populations across a range of taxa. Genetic and genomic data allow us to estimate numerous biological parameters through statistical genetics techniques. However, these techniques necessarily make many assumptions that do not match biology. As a result, the value of these statistical approaches may depend on the biological details of the evolutionary and demographic history of the populations being studied. Statistical genetics techniques need to be better tested and validated than they currently are, and the best way to do this is by comparisons to genetic simulation of biologically reasonable situations. This catalysis group will plan for the creation of a test bank of simulated genomic data. We will create a core list of biological scenarios that can test a wide variety of statistical methods, over a range of assumptions about evolutionary history, demography, and genetic details. Creating such simulations is non-trivial, because of the necessity of coding a variety of scenarios and the processor time required to do large-scale simulations. However, many types of statistical genetics techniques can be tested on a common set of simulations. In this way, we can share processor time and discuss as a community what issues are most important to cover. The group will mix statisticians and programmers with empirical biologists, with expertise in evolution, landscape ecology, and geospatial pattern analysis.
Source: NESCent

November 4, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 3, 2014

22:00
Odonates are model organisms for testing fundamental evolutionary questions because (1) they are one of the first winged insects); (2) have the most advanced vision and flight among insects; (3) their ecology and behavior is among the best studied for insects; and (4) they are easy to manipulate for field studies. However, a major obstacle to many odonate studies is the lack of odonate genomics resources. This gap in odonate genomics limits research progress but can be overcome by a focused effort that combines, analyzes and synthesizes existing and emerging datasets and knowledge in the field. This is now possible, as several research groups have started odonate genomics projects in the last 5 years, but formal communication between laboratories has yet to begin. The odonate community is geographically dispersed and many researchers are working in disparate fields (such as paleo-entomology, conservation/climate change, single gene evolution and/or comparative genomics), and therefore a Catalysis meeting would provide an ideal opportunity that will (1) foster international collaboration to create an effective network that will (2) focus community efforts towards a cohesive program to (3) generate new knowledge and a legacy of useful resources and novel research directions.
Source: NESCent

November 2, 2014

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent

October 28, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

October 22, 2014

22:00
Why are some genes imprinted, where the maternally or paternally inherited copies are preferentially expressed? Ever since the paradoxical pattern of imprinted gene expression was discovered evolutionary theories have strived to answer this question. Consequently, theories built on different fundamental assumptions have proliferated. Although these theories should make distinct and testable predictions, there have been few tests aimed at formally differentiating between these competing ideas. However, despite the general lack of such tests, the ‘kinship theory’, and especially its most prominent component, the ‘conflict hypothesis’, has emerged as the favored theory. This predominance is most notably reflected in the literature outside of evolutionary biology, where the conflict hypothesis is regularly used to interpret the functions and effects of imprinted genes. The conflict hypothesis rose to dominance because it appears to explain the effects of the first imprinted genes discovered. However, data from a broader array of genes in model species and emerging insights from non-model species appear to challenge whether one hypothesis adequately explains all occurrences of imprinting. We propose a working group composed of theoretical, computational and empirical biologists that will develop a set of formal predictions and devise tests to differentiate between competing models for the evolution of genomic imprinting. In doing so, we also expect to identify unexplored problems in evolutionary theory. Understanding why genes are imprinted also has important implications for evolutionary medicine since imprinted genes play a crucial role during pregnancy, in the manifestation of several behavioral disorders, and in some cancers.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Why are some genes imprinted, where the maternally or paternally inherited copies are preferentially expressed? Ever since the paradoxical pattern of imprinted gene expression was discovered evolutionary theories have strived to answer this question. Consequently, theories built on different fundamental assumptions have proliferated. Although these theories should make distinct and testable predictions, there have been few tests aimed at formally differentiating between these competing ideas. However, despite the general lack of such tests, the ‘kinship theory’, and especially its most prominent component, the ‘conflict hypothesis’, has emerged as the favored theory. This predominance is most notably reflected in the literature outside of evolutionary biology, where the conflict hypothesis is regularly used to interpret the functions and effects of imprinted genes. The conflict hypothesis rose to dominance because it appears to explain the effects of the first imprinted genes discovered. However, data from a broader array of genes in model species and emerging insights from non-model species appear to challenge whether one hypothesis adequately explains all occurrences of imprinting. We propose a working group composed of theoretical, computational and empirical biologists that will develop a set of formal predictions and devise tests to differentiate between competing models for the evolution of genomic imprinting. In doing so, we also expect to identify unexplored problems in evolutionary theory. Understanding why genes are imprinted also has important implications for evolutionary medicine since imprinted genes play a crucial role during pregnancy, in the manifestation of several behavioral disorders, and in some cancers.
Source: NESCent

October 21, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

October 20, 2014

00:57

—_000_8948C5EE68394E33A20E23BDF56CEFF6ugaedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS/BIOLOGICAL DATA SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA The Institute of Bioinformatics at the University of Georgia invites applications at the Assistant Professor level for a tenure-track faculty position in bioinformatics or computational biology starting August 2015. We welcome applications from candidates with experience in any area of bioinformatics or biological data science/data analytics research. The candidate should have a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in the sciences or any related field and a strong research record at the interface of computing and life science. The successful candidate will join our highly-active interdisciplinary program in Bioinformatics (http://iob.uga.edu) with a tenure home in one of the following Franklin College Departments: Computer Science, Genetics or Plant Biology (http://bit.ly/175F1fg). The candidate will be expected to maintain a rigorous, externally funded research program and contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching. To apply, candidates should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copies of their three best publications, and statements of research interests and teaching philosophy (no more than 4 pages total) as a single PDF file to http://bit.ly/14YbDNs. Three letters of recommendation should be uploaded separately to the same web site. The committee will begin reviewing app lications on December 1, 2014, and continue until the position has been filled. The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, its many units, and the University of Georgia are committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty and students and sustaining a work and learning environment that is inclusive. The University is an EEO/AA Institution. Women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. Georgia is well known for its quality of life in regard to both outdoor and urban activities. The University of Georgia, the oldest state-chartered university in the United States, is a land/sea grant institution located in the city of Athens (http://bit.ly/175F1fi), 70 miles northeast of Atlanta. Jessica C. Kissinger Professor of Genetics Director, Institute of Bioinformatics University of Georgia Assistant: Ms. Carrie Jarrard 706-542-7784 email:jckadmin@uga.edu —_000_8948C5EE68394E33A20E23BDF56CEFF6ugaedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS/BIOLOGICAL DATA SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA   The Institute of Bioinformatics at the University of Georgia invites applications at the Assistant Professor level for a tenure-track faculty position in bioinformatics or computational biology starting August 2015. We welcome applications from candidates with experience in any area of bioinformatics or biological data science/data analytics research. The candidate should have a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in the sciences or any related field and a strong research record at the interface of computing and life science. The successful candidate will join our highly-active interdisciplinary program in Bioinformatics (http://iob.uga.edu) with a tenure home in one of the following Franklin College Departments: Computer Science, Genetics or Plant Biology   (http://bit.ly/175F1fg). The candidate will be expected to maintain a rigorous, externally funded research program and contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching. To apply, candidates should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copies of their three best publications, and statements of research interests and teaching philosophy (no more than 4 pages total) as a single PDF file to http://bit.ly/14YbDNs. Three letters of recommendation should be uploaded separately to the same web site. The committee will begin reviewing applications on December 1, 2014, and continue until the position has been filled. The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, its many units, and the University of Georgia are committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty and students and sustaining a work and learning environment that is inclusive. The University is an EEO/AA Institution. Women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. Georgia is well known for its quality of life in regard to both outdoor and urban activities. The University of Georgia, the oldest state-chartered university in the United States, is a land/sea grant institution located in the city of Athens (http://bit.ly/175F1fi), 70 miles northeast of Atlanta.

Jessica C. Kissinger Professor of Genetics Director, Institute of Bioinformatics University of Georgia Assistant: Ms. Carrie Jarrard 706-542-7784  email:jckadmin@uga.edu  —_000_8948C5EE68394E33A20E23BDF56CEFF6ugaedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:41

California Academy of Sciences seeks an inspirational scientist who exemplifies the Academy$B!G(Bs mission to $B!H(Bexplore, explain, and sustain life on Earth.$B!I(B The candidate is expected to develop an internationally recognized research program on arachnids, communicate effectively with diverse audiences and address local or global sustainability issues. We value innovation and creativity in both funding and engaging public audiences. The endowed position includes an appropriate start-up package, modest annual funds for research and a full-time postdoctoral position. Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a statement of their research interests (not more than 3 pages), a statement of their sustainability and outreach goals (not more than 3 pages), and contact information for three references. Inquiries may also be directed to Dr. Brian Fisher (bfisher@calacademy.org), Chair of the search committee. Review of applications will begin January 2015. We encourage submission before that date, but applications will continue to be accepted until the position is filled. Please apply online through http://bit.ly/1y3NZcJ The California Academy of Sciences is an Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes applications from individuals who will contribute to its diversity. bpescador@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:25
Princeton University Postdoctoral research associate position on Genome Rearrangement, Transposons, Non-coding RNA, and Epigenetics Princeton University has a full-time post-doctoral position available in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to work in the Landweber Lab to study the mechanism and evolution of scrambled genomes in ciliates, particularly the role of non-coding RNAs (including long ncRNAs and small RNAs), chromatin, and other protein and epigenetic factors, using high-throughput and functional experimental research tools. Our lab uses Oxytricha as a model organism for large-scale genome rearrangements. You can read about our research at http://bit.ly/1a60oQC. Candidates are required to have a Ph.D. in molecular biology, molecular evolution, or a related field. For this position we seek candidates who have a range of experience with functional molecular biology and strong experimental skill; however, applications from candidates with an exceptional background in computational genomics and bioinformatics will also be considered. Excellent interpersonal skills, written and oral communication skills, organizational skills, and ability to work independently and collaboratively are all essential. This appointment will be for one year with the possibility of renewal contingent upon funding and satisfactory progress. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience; benefits are included. This position is available immediately and will be open until filled. Applicants should apply online at http://bit.ly/1EccNn5, Requisition #1400718, and include a curriculum vitae, a research statement (2 page max) describing background and experience and a cover letter that includes names and contact information of three references. Princeton University is an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. This position is subject to the University’s background check policy. Laura Landweber via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR