news aggregator

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 15, 2015

February 26, 2015

22:00
Evolutionary biology is a foundational and integrative science for medicine, but few physicians or medical researchers are familiar with its most relevant principles. While undergraduate students have increasing opportunities to learn about the interface of evolution, health, and disease, most premedical students have scant room for electives in their schedules, few premed prerequisite courses incorporate evolutionary thinking, and no medical school develops these competencies. The overarching goal of this Working Group is to lay the groundwork for future endeavors by providing testable models and pathways for infusing premedical and medical education with evolutionary thinking. This Working Group, an interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational group of physicians, scientists, educators, and students, will 1) define core competencies in evolutionary biology for physicians and other health professionals; 2) investigate the ability of current curricula to prepare health professionals to meet these standards; 3) identify “teachable moments” that provide opportunities to integrate evolutionary principles into premedical and medical curricula; 4) design model curricula and learning experiences that can advance evolutionary education for health professionals; and 5) provide open access to these resources and disseminate them. The Working Group will be supported by an Advisory Committee of senior academic leaders and stakeholders. These efforts will not be sufficient in themselves, but they will establish the intellectual platform from which educational interventions on student learning, and scientific and clinical problem solving, can be developed and tested.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Americans are far less accepting of human evolution than other realms of evolution; yet, human evolution and our common ancestry with other animals are increasingly relevant to medicine and our daily lives. We propose a NESCent working group made up of scientists, educators, and a journalist that will be devoted to enhancing communication of these health-related applications of human evolution to diverse audiences. Planned activities include discussion of methodological approaches designed to best communicate these ideas, design of teacher workshops, writing publications geared to each of these audiences, and discussion regarding collaboration with museums (in particular, the Smithsonian Institution) and zoos. In these activities, we will take a systematic scholarly approach using evidence-based methods to foster communication of principles of human evolution to these diverse audiences.
Source: NESCent

February 22, 2015

22:00
It is easily demonstrable that organisms with rapid, appropriate plastic responses to environmental change will prevail over genotypes with fixed phenotypes. It is also accepted that the general dearth of organisms successful across a wide environmental range indicates fundamental limits to or costs of plasticity. The nature of constraining factors has been broadly discussed (DeWitt et al. 1998), and numerous studies have been done to quantify them. However, a curious pattern has emerged: although hypothesized to be widespread, costs are absent more often than they are detected. The issue of costs of plasticity (CoP) lies at the intersection of a range of evolutionary and ecological questions: What are the limits to plasticity? Are CoP associated with life history tradeoffs? Are CoP expected in all environments? Does plasticity enhance invasiveness? etc. This working group will address two fundamental questions. 1) Are the expectations that costs of plasticity should be universal well-founded (i.e., the “no free lunch” principle)? Several authors have proposed that, in situations where the intensity of selection for adaptive plasticity is strong, there should be corresponding pressure to ameliorate costs. 2) Independently of the answer to the first question, Are analytical and experimental methods for detecting CoP appropriate or sufficiently sensitive? CoP have most often been studied using common garden style plasticity experiments and analyzed via van Tienderen’s (1991) multiple regression approach.
Source: NESCent

February 10, 2015

22:00
Meta-analysis is a statistical technique used for syntheses of results from numerous independent studies. Increasingly, evolutionary biologists need to perform meta-analysis in which the effects of numerous explanatory variables on a response variable of interest are considered, taking into account the evolutionary history of the species in the dataset. However, such analyses require analysis of numerous complex statistical models, and methods for such analyses have not been previously developed. Our working group is developing these methods and applying them to understand local adaptation, context-dependency, and the influence of evolutionary relationships on outcomes of symbiosis between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.
Source: NESCent

January 14, 2015

22:00
When a seed germinates determines the seasonal environment experienced by a plant throughout its life, and germination phenology is one of the very first phenotypes expressed by plants during ontogeny. As such, germination phenology is subject to extremely strong natural selection, especially during early stages of adaptation. Moreover, germination co-evolves with seed dispersal, mating system, and reproductive strategy to determine plant life cycles and demographic dynamics of plant populations. This working group will test the importance of germination adaptations in delimiting species niche and range limits, both in the past and in response to changed environments. More generally, this topic pertains to the identification of key traits associated with adaptation to environmental change, and the role that early life-stage traits and traits associated with habitat selection contribute to these dynamics. The focus on germination provides a clear and tractable system for addressing general evolutionary and ecological questions concerning the interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, trait coevolution, and the roles of habitat selection and organismal responses to their environment in niche evolution. It also will contribute tangibly to efforts to predict plant responses to environmental change. The group will compile and analyze a comprehensive data set on germination and dormancy, combined with data on niche breadth, geographic range, and life history, in order to test hypotheses concerning trait coevolution and species range limits. The group will also theoretically explore interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, theoretically model trait coevolution via habitat selection and bet hedging, and develop phenological models of integrated life histories that include germination in order to predict plant responses to environmental change.
Source: NESCent

January 13, 2015

22:00
Humans are vulnerable to a number of unique musculoskeletal maladies as a consequence of our evolutionary history. Although walking on our extended hind limbs is the hallmark adaptation characterizing our species it nevertheless makes us vulnerable to a wide range of serious joint and soft tissue problems. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective many of these medical issues become understandable and, indeed, novel methods of diagnosis and treatment can emerge. The proposed collaborative, a working group of paleoanthropologists, comparative anatomists, biomechanical engineers, and physicians will create new analytical approaches and new ways of viewing the disorders that uniquely plague our species. The results of this work include the development and implementation of a model curriculum, the creation of a website, and the publication of an edited volume. The disorders directly related to our way of walking include chronically sprained ankles, hernias, osteoporotic fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm, obstetric problems, knee problems, foot disorders, fatigue fractures, and many others. By understanding how our anatomy changed in order to walk upright, and why these changes occurred, we gain a better understanding of why these adaptations sometimes go awry resulting in disorders and pain.
Source: NESCent

December 17, 2014

22:00
We propose a catalysis meeting to advance theoretically-grounded, empirical study of scientific collaborations designed to achieve synthesis. Synthesis is the integration of diverse theories, methods and data across spatial or temporal scales, scientific phenomena, and forms of expertise to increase the generality, parsimony, applicability, or empirical soundness of scientific explanations. It generates emergent explanations beyond the scope of any one discipline, dataset or method. It counterbalances scientific specialization, capitalizes on existing data, and can be used to address complex problems. Synthesis centers are an increasingly vital component of science policy, rising in number, size, and prominence nationally and globally. Despite this, our understanding of synthesis-group collaborations and their performance are inadequate to advance knowledge, inform policy and guide practice. This meeting will draw together scientists who lead and conduct synthetic research with a diverse group of experts on scientific collaboration and research evaluation. Our aim is to advance understanding of synthesis and develop new approaches for investigating it empirically, longitudinally and comparatively.
Source: NESCent

December 9, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

December 7, 2014

22:00
Making science more reproducible has enormous potential to accelerate scientific advance, including for practicing individuals. Despite this, the tools and approaches that are already available are rarely taught. To address this, we are organizing a 4-day workshop aimed at developing, and later teaching, a short course curriculum for tools, resources, and practices for reproducible science. A part of the workshop will also be devoted to addressing gaps that hinder the broad adoption of such resources.
Source: NESCent

December 2, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 22, 2014

02:43
CUNY.NewYork.ComparativePopulationGenetics The Hickerson lab at the City University of New York has an opening for a PhD student who is interested in community-level population genetics and comparative phylogeography. The group is focusing on developing and implementing population genetic methods for understanding the evolutionary and demographic histories of species assemblages. The ideal candidate will have a strong interest or aptitude in quantitative biology, modeling, and programming as well as an interest in evolutionary genetics and biogeography. The lab welcomes qualified applicants with diverse backgrounds, including biology, anthropology, mathematics, physics, computer science, and related fields. This opening offers an opportunity for independent research in joint quantitative and empirical labs that now have 2 postdoctoral researchers, 3 PhD students and access to a wide array of population genomic datasets. We are in active collaboration with the lab of Ana Carnaval (CCNY) on an NSF-funded Dimensions of Biodiversity project (www.afbiota.org) focusing on the Atlantic Forest ecosystem of Brazil. There is a tight collaboration with the Kyle McDonalds group at City College of New York as well as with the research groups of Michelangeli and Thomas at the New York Botanical Garden. Through our 5 year NSF CAREER grant (http://1.usa.gov/1uM3lCZ), our group is also in close collaboration with the research groups led by Konrad Lohse (http://bit.ly/151xXaq) and Graham Stone at the University of Edinburgh (http://bit.ly/1AedKuC), as well as with Elizabeth Derryberry (Tulane; http://bit.ly/1EWRzHp) and curator Brian Smith from the nearby American museum of Natural History (http://bit.ly/1xkZwWq). The lab benefits from a thriving academic environment in New York City and has close ties with other biogeographically focused labs at CUNY and the American Museum of Natural History, as well as being part of the CUNY subprogram in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (http://bit.ly/1F0kpZc). We anticipate that the position would start in the Fall of 2015. If interested please contact Mike Hickerson (mhickersion at ccny.cuny.edu). Note that applications for Fall 2015 to the CUNY EEB subprogram must be received before January 1rst. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/1a2oJFKwww.afbiota.org) focusing on the Atlantic Forest ecosystem of Brazil. There is a tight collaboration with the Kyle McDonalds group at City College of New York as well as with the research groups of Michelangeli and Thomas at the New York Botanical Garden. Through our 5 year NSF CAREER grant (http://1.usa.gov/1uM3lCZ), our group is also in close collaboration with the research groups led by Konrad Lohse (http://bit.ly/151xXaq) and Graham Stone at the University of Edinburgh (http://bit.ly/1AedKuC), as well as with Elizabeth Derryberry (Tulane; http://bit.ly/1EWRzHp) and curator Brian Smith from the nearby American museum of Natural History (http://bit.ly/1xkZwWq). The lab benefits from a thriving academic environment in New York City and has close ties with other biogeographically focused labs at CUNY and the American Museum of Natural History, as well as being part of the CUNY subprogram in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (http://bit.ly/1F0kpZc). We anticipate that the position would start in the Fall of 2015. If interested please contact Mike Hickerson (mhickersion at ccny.cuny.edu). Note that applications for Fall 2015 to the CUNY EEB subprogram must be received before January 1rst. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/1a2oJFK Mike Hickerson Associate Professor City College of New York - Biology Department; City University of New York Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Sub-Program 160 Convent Ave New York, NY 10031 phone 212-650-8530 lab 212-650-3457 Research Associate - Division of Invertebrate Zoology American Museum of Natural Historyhttp://hickerlab.wordpress.com/ mhickerson@ccny.cuny.edu Mike Hickerson via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:26
Dear Colleagues, I am seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral researcher with an exceptional background in bioinformatics, functional genomics, or evolutionary genomics. Experience analyzing Illumina sequence data, computer programming proficiency, and training in ecological or evolutionary genetics are highly desirable. We recently received generous funding for yeast evolutionary genomics research from the National Science Foundations Dimensions of Biodiversity Program (http://1.usa.gov/1vnuUlV) and the Pew Charitable Trusts (http://bit.ly/1ruTJKa). With Antonis Rokas (Vanderbilt) and Cletus P. Kurtzman (USDA), the Y1000+ Project (http://1.usa.gov/1vnuUlW) seeks to sequence and analyze the to complete genomes of all ~1,000 known species of Saccharomycotina yeasts and determine the genetic basis of their metabolic, ecological, and functional diversification. Yeasts are genetically more diverse than vertebrates and have remarkable metabolic dexterity, but most remain minimally characterized. They compete vigorously for nutrients in every continent and biome and can produce everything from beer to oil. The history of yeasts is recorded in their genome sequences. Now is the time to read it and tell their story! The Hittinger Lab has diverse funding for other basic and applied research from NSF, DOE, and USDA, but we are specifically expanding our basic research in ecological and evolutionary genomics. The complete advertisement and application instructions can be found here: http://bit.ly/1ruTKhh. The precise start date is flexible, but candidates should apply by November 30th to receive full consideration. Sincerely, Chris Todd Hittinger, Assistant Professor of Genetics Genome Center of Wisconsin J. F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution University of Wisconsin-Madison 425-G Henry Mall, 2434 Genetics/Biotechnology Center Madison, WI 53706-1580 cthittinger@wisc.edu, (608) 890-2586 http://bit.ly/1vnuUm0 Chris Hittinger via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:59
Postdoctoral Position Genomics of Migration My group combines several biological disciplines including behavioural observation, evolutionary genomics, molecular ecology, and bioinformatics, and utilises emergent technologies to identify the genetic basis of migratory traits. Here we focus on identifying the genes and signaling pathways behind the components shaping the migratory phenotype in the blackcap, a well characterised migratory songbird species. We will complement the sequencing approach with gene expression profiling and characterisation of chromatin modification to investigate the extent of phenotypic variation manifested by expression differences, either through slight genetic differences or epigenetic processes. The key focus of this project is to understand: Which genes harbour coding variation with relevant consequences for migratory traits, and which signalling cascades are involved in shaping the migratory phenotype? Within this project that is funded through a Max Planck Research Group Grant, I am offering a 2 year postdoctoral position with the possibility for extension. The postdoc will assume a central position within this project that is funded through an independent Max Planck Research Group Grant. Project start is January 2015 and the ideal starting date for the postdoc is April 2015. The ideal candidate has a biological training, background in bioinformatics with skills in programming (scripts and analysis pipelines), next generation sequence analysis, genome assembly and annotation. The successful candidate will be involved in fundamental research questions on migratory genomics, and I highly appreciate a creative postdoc who is motivated to contribute to and extends our research agenda to understand the genetic architecture of migratory traits. The core dataset that will be generated includes Illumina sequencing of the blackcap genome from populations with varying migratory phenotypes, some of which will be used for de novo genome assembly. The expected output of the postdoc is to contribute to the genome assembly and to compare the genomic makeup and underlying signaling pathways of different populations with various migratory phenotypes. We offer an English speaking and ambitious working environment at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Pln, Germany. Cutting edge infrastructure is available at all levels, including high-performance computer clusters and next-generation sequencing core facility. The Institutes main fields of work include evolutionary ecology (Prof. Dr. M. Milinski), evolutionary genetics (Prof. Dr. D. Tautz) and evolutionary theory (Prof. Dr. A. Traulsen) and hosts a number of research groups providing ample opportunities for collaborations and interactions. The MPI in Pln further collaborates with the nearby Christian Albrechts University of Kiel in a joint International Max Planck Research School that attracts PhD students from abroad which contributes to a multicultural working atmosphere. The Max Planck Society is committed to also employing handicapped individuals and especially encourages them to apply. The Max Planck Society seeks to increase the number of women in those areas where they are underrepresented and therefore explicitly encourages women to apply. Applications should include 1) a cover letter outlining your motivation to work on this project as well as relevant experience, 2) a detailed curriculum vitae and copies of certificates, and 3) the contact details of three academic referees. Please send the above as a single .pdf file to liedvogel@evolbio.mpg.de. Review of applications will start on January 1st 2015, but candidates will be considered until the position is filled. For more information, feel free to contact me! Miriam Liedvogel liedvogel@evolbio.mpg.de Max Planck Research Group Behavioural Genomics Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology August-Thienemann-Strae 2 24306 Pln, Germany http://bit.ly/1uOKA0F Miriam Liedvogel via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:59
Marine Invertebrate Biologist The Department of Marine Biology and Ecology (MBE) formerly known as the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries (MBF) at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, RSMAS , invites applications for a tenure-track position in Marine Invertebrate Biology as part of a broad strategic plan involving 16 faculty hires over the coming few years. This will be a 9-month guaranteed salary position and is intended to be at the rank of Assistant Professor but exceptional applicants at other ranks will be considered. The anticipated start date is August 2015. We are searching for an outstanding candidate working on any marine invertebrate group and questions. Potential research areas include, but are not restricted to: comparative or developmental physiology, organism-environment interactions, toxicology, climate change impacts, ecological and/or evolutionary genomics, or ecology. Preference will be given to applicants applying a broad range of techniques and approaches with strong potential for within and among department collaborations, as well as interactions with our Coral Gables and Medical campuses . Research interests of the faculty in MBE span, in no particular order, fisheries/population level biology; coastal and coral reef biology, ecology and conservation; organismal biology; marine health and biomedicine, and biological oceanography. The successful applicant will be housed in the recently inaugurated 85,000 sf Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Complex that hosts state-of-the-science biological and chemical labs for seawater research and hands-on teaching. In addition, the hire would have access to marine invertebrate culture facilities associated with our NIH-supported National Resource for Aplysia, as well as the extensive collections of our Marine Invertebrate Museum . The hire will also have access to on-campus research vessels, including the F.G. Walton Smith (a 96-foot research catamaran), multiple smaller boats, Broad Key (a 63-acre island recently acquired as a field station for marine research and education, as well as a pool currently under construction for the training of scientific divers. The successful candidate will contribute to teaching and mentoring students at the undergraduate and graduate level, and is expected to teach Invertebrate Zoology in our top-ranked Marine Sciences undergraduate (B.S.) program, and related courses in our graduate programs (Ph. D., M. S. and Professional Masters). The RSMAS campus is located on Virginia Key, a unique community of marine research and educational institutions 15 minutes from downtown Miami, Florida. Approximately $250M per year is invested in marine science and education on Virginia Key, including RSMAS, the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center, the Miami Seaquarium, and the Maritime and Science Technology Academy (MAST). Applicants must have a Ph. D. in a relevant field, appropriate postdoctoral training, and the ability to establish and maintain a vigorous, extramurally-funded research program. A complete application includes a cover letter, curriculum vitae, separate statements of research and teaching interests, and the names and contact information of at least three references. The position will remain opened until filled, but to receive full consideration, applications should be received by January 15, 2014. We anticipate conducting interviews for the positions in February 2015. Inquiries should be directed to MBEsearch@rsmas.miami.edu The University of Miami is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and we encourage qualified individuals to apply regardless of race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or gender expression. Andrew C. Baker, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Miami Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation Visit the lab on Facebook by clicking here Department of Marine Biology and Ecology Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy. Miami, FL 33149, USA Office: +1 (305) 421-4642 Lab: +1 (305) 421-4226 Fax: +1 (305) 421-4600 Email: abaker@rsmas.miami.edu Associate Conservation Scientist Wildlife Conservation Society www.wcs.org/marine Andrew Baker via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:48
Hi, We have been having serious problems with the PC supplied with our ABI 3130 sequencer. It is now looking very likely that the PC will have to be replaced. I have therefore been wondering if it is possible to successfully run a 3130 sequencer using a different PC to that with which it is supplied. I would be interested to know how well the Genemapper software runs on different PCs. Thank you, Robert Donnelly robert.donnelly@plymouth.ac.uk Robert Donnelly via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:28
Conference: Lausanne.ESEB2015_ExperimentalEvolutionOfEcosystems.Aug10-14 Dear evoldir members, We would like to announce the symposium Experimental evolution and ecology of (microbial and other) ecosystems at the ESEB 2015 conference and would like to invite abstract submissions. This symposium aims at showcasing recent studies and bringing together ecological and (experimental) evolutionary approaches to study the evolution of ecosystems. In natural systems, organisms and species evolve not in isolation but embedded into ecosystems. Several models describe such relationships, for example the Red Queen and niche construction theories as well as metabolism-based models. Such models have shown that evolutionary processes on the ecosystem level can be highly complex. To investigate this phenomenon experimentally, laboratory approaches have simplified the situation by studying evolutionary dynamics using a (very) limited number of strains at a time under controlled laboratory conditions in the powerful approach of experimental evolution. Others studies have utilized a more ecological approach by observing and describing complex systems and how organisms and species can V or cannot V co-exist over time. Increasingly, research has been initiated that combines these two approaches by tracking evolutionary changes of complex ecosystems in laboratory and natural conditions. Examples include studies of the dynamics of species composition in (microbial) ecosystems over space and time and in response to various stresses, the evolution of social interaction between microbes, and long-term co-evolutionary studies between different (sets of) species or genotypes. For this symposium, we invite submissions of experimental and theoretical studies in this area. * Invited speakers: Susi Remold (University of Louisville) http://bit.ly/11NqzhB Tom Bell (Imperial College London) http://bit.ly/1uOKxSl * Organisers: Sijmen Schoustra (Wageningen University and University of Zambia) and Susanne Kraemer (University of Edinburgh). * Deadline for submission for abstracts for contributed talks and posters is 10th January 2015. More information can be found at http://bit.ly/11NqzxR submission/ . We look forward to receiving your submissions and to seeing you at the conference and our symposium. Dr Sijmen E Schoustra Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University, the Netherlands & Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Zambia Phone: +31 317 483142 and +260 974 572686 http://bit.ly/1veNTR5 “Schoustra, Sijmen” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR