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May 17, 2015

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 28, 2015

22:00
A number of independent efforts have compiled global plant databases on functionally important traits of leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers. These databases are comprised of 1000's to tens of 1000's of species. With a few notable exceptions, they have not been analyzed in an evolutionary or phylogenetic context. However, when synthesized with a modern molecular phylogeny, these data could tell a comprehensive, multivariate story of the evolution of plant functional diversity. In this working group, we will merge multiple databases to explore the rate (tempo, sensu GG Simpson) of evolution of these traits and the best fit evolutionary model(s) (mode) underlying the trait diversification of land plants. We will ask 1. whether important divergences in trait space occurred along similar branches for different traits, 2. whether there were periods of evolution when trait diversification was especially rapid, and 3. whether there were interactions between trait evolution and rates of speciation and extinction. This work will lead to a new community resource of great interest—an internally synced trait matrix—matched with the current state-of-the-art phylogeny. These data can then be synthesized with fossil evidence to explore whether the tempo and mode of trait evolution in extant and extinct taxa provide similar stories. Furthermore, these data will provide a powerful view into the coordinated (or lack thereof) evolution of ecologically important traits across vascular plants—one of the most diverse and important lineages in the world today.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 15, 2015

February 26, 2015

22:00
Evolutionary biology is a foundational and integrative science for medicine, but few physicians or medical researchers are familiar with its most relevant principles. While undergraduate students have increasing opportunities to learn about the interface of evolution, health, and disease, most premedical students have scant room for electives in their schedules, few premed prerequisite courses incorporate evolutionary thinking, and no medical school develops these competencies. The overarching goal of this Working Group is to lay the groundwork for future endeavors by providing testable models and pathways for infusing premedical and medical education with evolutionary thinking. This Working Group, an interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational group of physicians, scientists, educators, and students, will 1) define core competencies in evolutionary biology for physicians and other health professionals; 2) investigate the ability of current curricula to prepare health professionals to meet these standards; 3) identify “teachable moments” that provide opportunities to integrate evolutionary principles into premedical and medical curricula; 4) design model curricula and learning experiences that can advance evolutionary education for health professionals; and 5) provide open access to these resources and disseminate them. The Working Group will be supported by an Advisory Committee of senior academic leaders and stakeholders. These efforts will not be sufficient in themselves, but they will establish the intellectual platform from which educational interventions on student learning, and scientific and clinical problem solving, can be developed and tested.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Americans are far less accepting of human evolution than other realms of evolution; yet, human evolution and our common ancestry with other animals are increasingly relevant to medicine and our daily lives. We propose a NESCent working group made up of scientists, educators, and a journalist that will be devoted to enhancing communication of these health-related applications of human evolution to diverse audiences. Planned activities include discussion of methodological approaches designed to best communicate these ideas, design of teacher workshops, writing publications geared to each of these audiences, and discussion regarding collaboration with museums (in particular, the Smithsonian Institution) and zoos. In these activities, we will take a systematic scholarly approach using evidence-based methods to foster communication of principles of human evolution to these diverse audiences.
Source: NESCent

February 22, 2015

22:00
It is easily demonstrable that organisms with rapid, appropriate plastic responses to environmental change will prevail over genotypes with fixed phenotypes. It is also accepted that the general dearth of organisms successful across a wide environmental range indicates fundamental limits to or costs of plasticity. The nature of constraining factors has been broadly discussed (DeWitt et al. 1998), and numerous studies have been done to quantify them. However, a curious pattern has emerged: although hypothesized to be widespread, costs are absent more often than they are detected. The issue of costs of plasticity (CoP) lies at the intersection of a range of evolutionary and ecological questions: What are the limits to plasticity? Are CoP associated with life history tradeoffs? Are CoP expected in all environments? Does plasticity enhance invasiveness? etc. This working group will address two fundamental questions. 1) Are the expectations that costs of plasticity should be universal well-founded (i.e., the “no free lunch” principle)? Several authors have proposed that, in situations where the intensity of selection for adaptive plasticity is strong, there should be corresponding pressure to ameliorate costs. 2) Independently of the answer to the first question, Are analytical and experimental methods for detecting CoP appropriate or sufficiently sensitive? CoP have most often been studied using common garden style plasticity experiments and analyzed via van Tienderen’s (1991) multiple regression approach.
Source: NESCent

February 10, 2015

22:00
Meta-analysis is a statistical technique used for syntheses of results from numerous independent studies. Increasingly, evolutionary biologists need to perform meta-analysis in which the effects of numerous explanatory variables on a response variable of interest are considered, taking into account the evolutionary history of the species in the dataset. However, such analyses require analysis of numerous complex statistical models, and methods for such analyses have not been previously developed. Our working group is developing these methods and applying them to understand local adaptation, context-dependency, and the influence of evolutionary relationships on outcomes of symbiosis between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.
Source: NESCent

January 14, 2015

22:00
When a seed germinates determines the seasonal environment experienced by a plant throughout its life, and germination phenology is one of the very first phenotypes expressed by plants during ontogeny. As such, germination phenology is subject to extremely strong natural selection, especially during early stages of adaptation. Moreover, germination co-evolves with seed dispersal, mating system, and reproductive strategy to determine plant life cycles and demographic dynamics of plant populations. This working group will test the importance of germination adaptations in delimiting species niche and range limits, both in the past and in response to changed environments. More generally, this topic pertains to the identification of key traits associated with adaptation to environmental change, and the role that early life-stage traits and traits associated with habitat selection contribute to these dynamics. The focus on germination provides a clear and tractable system for addressing general evolutionary and ecological questions concerning the interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, trait coevolution, and the roles of habitat selection and organismal responses to their environment in niche evolution. It also will contribute tangibly to efforts to predict plant responses to environmental change. The group will compile and analyze a comprehensive data set on germination and dormancy, combined with data on niche breadth, geographic range, and life history, in order to test hypotheses concerning trait coevolution and species range limits. The group will also theoretically explore interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, theoretically model trait coevolution via habitat selection and bet hedging, and develop phenological models of integrated life histories that include germination in order to predict plant responses to environmental change.
Source: NESCent

January 13, 2015

22:00
Humans are vulnerable to a number of unique musculoskeletal maladies as a consequence of our evolutionary history. Although walking on our extended hind limbs is the hallmark adaptation characterizing our species it nevertheless makes us vulnerable to a wide range of serious joint and soft tissue problems. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective many of these medical issues become understandable and, indeed, novel methods of diagnosis and treatment can emerge. The proposed collaborative, a working group of paleoanthropologists, comparative anatomists, biomechanical engineers, and physicians will create new analytical approaches and new ways of viewing the disorders that uniquely plague our species. The results of this work include the development and implementation of a model curriculum, the creation of a website, and the publication of an edited volume. The disorders directly related to our way of walking include chronically sprained ankles, hernias, osteoporotic fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm, obstetric problems, knee problems, foot disorders, fatigue fractures, and many others. By understanding how our anatomy changed in order to walk upright, and why these changes occurred, we gain a better understanding of why these adaptations sometimes go awry resulting in disorders and pain.
Source: NESCent

December 17, 2014

22:00
We propose a catalysis meeting to advance theoretically-grounded, empirical study of scientific collaborations designed to achieve synthesis. Synthesis is the integration of diverse theories, methods and data across spatial or temporal scales, scientific phenomena, and forms of expertise to increase the generality, parsimony, applicability, or empirical soundness of scientific explanations. It generates emergent explanations beyond the scope of any one discipline, dataset or method. It counterbalances scientific specialization, capitalizes on existing data, and can be used to address complex problems. Synthesis centers are an increasingly vital component of science policy, rising in number, size, and prominence nationally and globally. Despite this, our understanding of synthesis-group collaborations and their performance are inadequate to advance knowledge, inform policy and guide practice. This meeting will draw together scientists who lead and conduct synthetic research with a diverse group of experts on scientific collaboration and research evaluation. Our aim is to advance understanding of synthesis and develop new approaches for investigating it empirically, longitudinally and comparatively.
Source: NESCent
12:02
The Natural History Museum has released their data portal (http://data.nhm.ac.uk/). As of now it contains 2,439,827 of the Museum's 80 million specimens, so it's still early days. I gather that soon this data will also appear in GBIF, ending the unfortunate situation where data from one of the premier natural history collections in the world was conspicuous by its absence.

I've not had a chance to explore it in much detail, but one thing I'm keen to do is see whether I can link citations of NHM specimens in the literature (e.g., articles in BioStor) with records in the NHM portal. Being able to dip this would enable all sorts of cool things, such as being able to track what researchers have said about particular specimens, as well as develop citation metrics for the collection.

Source: iPhylo
11:31
On a recent trip to the Natural History Museum, London, the subject of DNA barcoding came up, and I got the clear impression that people at the NHM thought classical DNA barcoding was pretty much irrelevant, given recent developments in sequencing technology. For example, why sequence just COI when you can use shotgun sequencing to get the whole mitogenome? I was a little taken aback, although this is a view that's getting some traction, e.g. [1,2]. There is also the more radical view that focussing on phylogenetics is itself less useful than, say, "evolutionary gene networks" based on massive sequencing of multiple markers [3].

At the risk of seeming old-fashioned in liking DNA barcoding, I think there's a bigger issue at stake (see also [4]). DNA barcoding isn't simply a case of using a single, short marker to identify animal species. It's the fact that it's a globalised, standardised approach that makes it so powerful. In the wonderful book "A Vast Machine" [5], Paul Edwards talks about "global data" and "making data global". The idea is that not only do we want data that is global in coverage ("global data"), but we want data that can be integrated ("making data global"). In other words, not only do we want data from everywhere in the world, say, we also need an agreed coordinate system (e.g., latitude and longitude) in order to put each data item in a global context. DNA barcoding makes data global by standardising what a barcode is (a given fragment of COI), and what metadata needs to be associated with a sequence to be a barcode (e.g., latitude and longitude) (see, e.g. Guest post: response to "Putting GenBank Data on the Map"). By insisting on this standardisation, we potentially sacrifice the kinds of cool things that can be done with metagenomics, but the tradeoff is that we can do things like put a million barcodes on a map:


To regard barcoding as dead or outdated we'd need an equivalent effort to make metagenomic sequences of animals global in the same way that DNA barcoding is. Now, it may well be that the economics of sequencing is such that it is just as cheap to shotgun sequence mitogenomes, say, as to extract single markers such as COI. If that's the case, and we can get a standardised suite of markers across all taxa, and we can do this across museum collections (like Hebert et al.'s [6] DNA barcoding "blitz" of 41,650 specimens in a butterfly collection), then I'm all for it. But it's not clear to me that this is the case.

This also leaves aside the issue of standardising other things's much as the metadata. For instance, Dowton et al. [2] state that "recent developments make a barcoding approach that utilizes a single locus outdated" (see Collins and Cruickshank [4] for a response). Dowton et al. make use of data they published earlier [7,8]. Out of curiosity I looked at some of these sequences in GenBank, such as JN964715. This is a COI sequence, in other words, a classical DNA barcode. Unfortunately, it lacks a latitude and longitude. By leaving off latitude and longitude (despite the authors having this information, as it is in the supplemental material for [7]) the authors have missed an opportunity to make their data global.

For me the take home message here is that whether you think DNA barcoding is outdated depends in part what your goal is. Clearly barcoding as a sequencing technology has been superseded by more recent developments. But to dismiss it on those grounds is to miss the bigger picture of what is a stake, namely the chance to have comparable data for millions of samples across the globe.

References
  1. TAYLOR, H. R., & HARRIS, W. E. (2012, February 22). An emergent science on the brink of irrelevance: a review of the past 8 years of DNA barcoding. Molecular Ecology Resources. Wiley-Blackwell. doi:10.1111/j.1755-0998.2012.03119.x
  2. Dowton, M., Meiklejohn, K., Cameron, S. L., & Wallman, J. (2014, March 28). A Preliminary Framework for DNA Barcoding, Incorporating the Multispecies Coalescent. Systematic Biology. Oxford University Press (OUP). doi:10.1093/sysbio/syu028
  3. Bittner, L., Halary, S., Payri, C., Cruaud, C., de Reviers, B., Lopez, P., & Bapteste, E. (2010). Some considerations for analyzing biodiversity using integrative metagenomics and gene networks. Biol Direct. Springer Science + Business Media. doi:10.1186/1745-6150-5-47
  4. Collins, R. A., & Cruickshank, R. H. (2014, August 12). Known Knowns, Known Unknowns, Unknown Unknowns and Unknown Knowns in DNA Barcoding: A Comment on Dowton et al. Systematic Biology. Oxford University Press (OUP). doi:10.1093/sysbio/syu060
  5. Edwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming. MIT Press ISBN: 9780262013925
  6. Hebert, P. D. N., deWaard, J. R., Zakharov, E. V., Prosser, S. W. J., Sones, J. E., McKeown, J. T. A., Mantle, B., et al. (2013, July 10). A DNA “Barcode Blitz”: Rapid Digitization and Sequencing of a Natural History Collection. (S.-O. Kolokotronis, Ed.)PLoS ONE. Public Library of Science (PLoS). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068535
  7. Meiklejohn, K. A., Wallman, J. F., Pape, T., Cameron, S. L., & Dowton, M. (2013, October). Utility of COI, CAD and morphological data for resolving relationships within the genus Sarcophaga (sensu lato) (Diptera: Sarcophagidae): A preliminary study. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Elsevier BV. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2013.04.034
  8. Meiklejohn, K. A., Wallman, J. F., Cameron, S. L., & Dowton, M. (2012). Comprehensive evaluation of DNA barcoding for the molecular species identification of forensically important Australian Sarcophagidae (Diptera). Invertebrate Systematics. CSIRO Publishing. doi:10.1071/is12008

Source: iPhylo
02:53
Gould Award announcement The Society for the Study of Evolutions Committee for the Stephen J. Gould Award for the Improvement for the Understanding of Evolution is soliciting nominations for the Award for 2015. With this annual award the Society for the Study of Evolution recognizes, promotes, and rewards individuals who have increased public understanding of evolutionary biology and its place in modern science. The award will include a cash prize of $5,000 and the expectation that the recipient will present the Public Outreach Seminar at the Evolution Meeting (expenses for travel/lodging and registration would be covered by the SSE). The awardee should be a leader in evolutionary thought and in public outreach who can deliver an inspiring lecture for both professionals and the broader public at the 2015 meetings of the Society in San Paolo, Brazil. Nominations should include the CV of the nominee along with a 1-2 page letter describing why this individual is worthy of the award. Please send nominations via e-mail to the Chair of the Committee, Steve Palumbi, at spalumbi@stanford.edu. Please submit names of nominees by December 18. All nominations will be treated confidentially and will be evaluated by members of the Committee and the Council for the Society. An awardee will be announced in early February. Stephen R. Palumbi Harold A Miller Director, Hopkins Marine Station Jane and Marshall Steel Professor of Biology Stanford University Steve Palumbi via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:53
Computational Biologist - Research & Development 23andMe Mountain View, CA, United States Do you wish that your work had a more direct impact on people? Are you excited about the potential of human genetics to make a real difference in the world? At 23andMe, we believe that genetics is on the cusp of huge advances, and that our unique database of hundreds of thousands of genotypes and almost two hundred million phenotype data points gives us an incredible opportunity to advance not only biomedical research, but our understanding of ourselves. We are looking for a colleague with extensive training and experience in computational biology to join our highly productive, world-class research team. This person will be involved in the analysis of human genetic data and the development of product features that depend on a mix of computational skills, statistical knowledge, creativity, and biological insight. The scope and breadth of our vision means that most of the necessary techniques have yet to be developed anywhere in the world. This person is also expected to participate in the communication and public relations efforts of the company. QUALIFICATIONS: - PhD in Computational Biology or related field (eg, Genetics, Computer Science, Engineering, Physics, Math, Bioinformatics) - Strong bioinformatics and biostatistics background - Background in algorithm development - Proficiency with scripting languages (eg, Python, R, bash) - Enthusiasm for working in a highly collaborative environment ALSO VALUABLE: - Evolutionary or population genetics research experience - Demonstrated record of developing and distributing tools for the analysis and visualization of genomics data - Experience with C/C++ Experience mentoring other scientists and familiarity with epidemiological principles are highly desirable. Apply online: http://bit.ly/1szeN0H ABOUT US 23andMe is the leading personal genetics company. We are dedicated to helping individuals understand their own genetic information through DNA analysis technologies and web-based interactive tools. Our mission is to personalize health care by making and supporting meaningful discoveries through genetic research. Combining web development, computer science, genetics, social media, and informatics, 23andMe is at the forefront of a new era in personal genetics. Kasia Bryc via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:37

—Apple-Mail=_975A4FE6-3B15-476B-9CA4-7AA827601258 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii DARWIN FELLOW The Graduate Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at University of Massachusetts Amherst announces a two-year POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP/LECTURESHIP. OEB draws together more than 80 faculty from the Five Colleges (University of Massachusetts Amherst and Smith, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Amherst Colleges), offering unique training and research opportunities in the fields of ecology, organismic and evolutionary biology. Our research/lecture position provides recent PhD’s an opportunity for independent research with an OEB faculty sponsor, as well as experience mentoring graduate students and teaching a one-semester undergraduate biology course. The successful candidate will have a recent PhD in a field relevant to ecology, organismic or evolutionary biology and proven teaching skills. Position subject to availability of funds. To apply online, please go to http://bit.ly/1qZcTLk and submit a CV, statements of research and teaching interests, and arrange for 3 letters of reference and a letter of support from your proposed OEB faculty sponsor. A list of OEB faculty and additional information is available at http://bit.ly/1vYlB89 . Applicants should apply by the priority deadline of January 26, 2015 in order to ensure consideration. The position is expected to start in August 2015. Questions about this search may be sent to: oeb@bio.umass.edu The University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members —Apple-Mail=_975A4FE6-3B15-476B-9CA4-7AA827601258 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

DARWIN FELLOWThe Graduate Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at University of Massachusetts Amherst announces a two-year POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP/LECTURESHIP.  OEB draws together more than 80 faculty from the Five Colleges (University of Massachusetts Amherst and Smith, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Amherst Colleges), offering unique training and research opportunities in the fields of ecology, organismic and evolutionary biology. Our research/lecture position provides recent PhD’s an opportunity for independent research with an OEB faculty sponsor, as well as experience mentoring graduate students and teaching a one-semester undergraduate biology course. The successful candidate will have a recent PhD in a field relevant to ecology, organismic or evolutionary biology and proven teaching skills. Pos ition subject to availability of funds. To apply online, please go to http://bit.ly/1vYlB8a; and submit a CV, statements of research and teaching interests, and arrange for 3 letters of reference and a letter of support from your proposed OEB faculty sponsor.  A list of OEB faculty and additional information is available at http://bit.ly/1qZcTLo;. Applicants should apply by the priority deadline of January 26, 2015 in order to ensure consideration.  The position is expected to start in August 2015.  Questions about this search may be sent to: oeb@bio.umass.eduThe University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, mino rities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members  



—Apple-Mail=_975A4FE6-3B15-476B-9CA4-7AA82760125 via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:37
A 2-year postdoc position is available at SLU, Alnarp: Plant Resistance Ecology: A new tool to engineer pollination In strawberries herbivore-damaged plants deter pollinators, leading to reduced pollination success. However, wild plant genotypes, as well as domesticated varieties, differ in their resistance against herbivores. The aim of this postdoc project is to investigate whether pollination success is improved when wild strawberries evolve stronger resistance, and during plant breeding for improved resistance in domesticated varieties. The postdoc will have access to a large common garden with 100 wild plant genotypes (Fragaria vesca), and several domesticated varieties (Fragaria x ananassa, F. vesca, F. viridis, F. moschata), that differ in their resistance against herbivores. The full ad can be downloaded here: http://bit.ly/1vYlARM Johan Johan A. Stenberg Associate Professor Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Department of Plant Protection Biology PO Box 102, SE-230 53 ALNARP Visiting address: Sundsvgen 14 Mobile: +46 70 622 00 42 johan.stenberg@slu.se, www.slu.se/stenberg Johan A Stenberg via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR