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May 21, 2015

22:00
In the last two decades, models from evolutionary biology have made important contributions to demographic research on human fertility change. Within this evolutionary framework, two distinct traditions have focused on different processes of adaptation and time scales of change: (1) behavioral ecological perspectives have focused on how individual fertility decisions are shaped by local ecological circumstances, while (2) cultural evolutionary approaches have emphasized the role of socially transmitted information and changing social norms in shaping fertility behavior. While each tradition has made independent progress, research that integrates these approaches is necessary to improve our understanding of real fertility behavior, which results from a feedback between individual fertility decisions and social change. This approach requires combined attention to immediate ecological determinants of fertility decisions as well as the long-term processes that shape costs and benefits in a given environment. This workshop will bring together an international team of evolutionary behavioral scientists with complementary methodological and theoretical expertise in anthropology, psychology, and demography to develop (a) a synthetic article which proposes how these approaches can be integrated methodologically and theoretically, (b) an empirical article which applies our new synthetic framework to the study of fertility change in a particular fieldsite, demonstrating how the new methodological approach will work in practice and what we can learn through employing it, and (c) a multi-site grant proposal (UK, US, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Poland) aimed at integrating and empirically testing these diverse evolutionary models of human fertility change.
Source: NESCent

May 17, 2015

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 28, 2015

22:00
A number of independent efforts have compiled global plant databases on functionally important traits of leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers. These databases are comprised of 1000's to tens of 1000's of species. With a few notable exceptions, they have not been analyzed in an evolutionary or phylogenetic context. However, when synthesized with a modern molecular phylogeny, these data could tell a comprehensive, multivariate story of the evolution of plant functional diversity. In this working group, we will merge multiple databases to explore the rate (tempo, sensu GG Simpson) of evolution of these traits and the best fit evolutionary model(s) (mode) underlying the trait diversification of land plants. We will ask 1. whether important divergences in trait space occurred along similar branches for different traits, 2. whether there were periods of evolution when trait diversification was especially rapid, and 3. whether there were interactions between trait evolution and rates of speciation and extinction. This work will lead to a new community resource of great interest—an internally synced trait matrix—matched with the current state-of-the-art phylogeny. These data can then be synthesized with fossil evidence to explore whether the tempo and mode of trait evolution in extant and extinct taxa provide similar stories. Furthermore, these data will provide a powerful view into the coordinated (or lack thereof) evolution of ecologically important traits across vascular plants—one of the most diverse and important lineages in the world today.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 15, 2015

February 26, 2015

22:00
Evolutionary biology is a foundational and integrative science for medicine, but few physicians or medical researchers are familiar with its most relevant principles. While undergraduate students have increasing opportunities to learn about the interface of evolution, health, and disease, most premedical students have scant room for electives in their schedules, few premed prerequisite courses incorporate evolutionary thinking, and no medical school develops these competencies. The overarching goal of this Working Group is to lay the groundwork for future endeavors by providing testable models and pathways for infusing premedical and medical education with evolutionary thinking. This Working Group, an interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational group of physicians, scientists, educators, and students, will 1) define core competencies in evolutionary biology for physicians and other health professionals; 2) investigate the ability of current curricula to prepare health professionals to meet these standards; 3) identify “teachable moments” that provide opportunities to integrate evolutionary principles into premedical and medical curricula; 4) design model curricula and learning experiences that can advance evolutionary education for health professionals; and 5) provide open access to these resources and disseminate them. The Working Group will be supported by an Advisory Committee of senior academic leaders and stakeholders. These efforts will not be sufficient in themselves, but they will establish the intellectual platform from which educational interventions on student learning, and scientific and clinical problem solving, can be developed and tested.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Americans are far less accepting of human evolution than other realms of evolution; yet, human evolution and our common ancestry with other animals are increasingly relevant to medicine and our daily lives. We propose a NESCent working group made up of scientists, educators, and a journalist that will be devoted to enhancing communication of these health-related applications of human evolution to diverse audiences. Planned activities include discussion of methodological approaches designed to best communicate these ideas, design of teacher workshops, writing publications geared to each of these audiences, and discussion regarding collaboration with museums (in particular, the Smithsonian Institution) and zoos. In these activities, we will take a systematic scholarly approach using evidence-based methods to foster communication of principles of human evolution to these diverse audiences.
Source: NESCent

February 22, 2015

22:00
It is easily demonstrable that organisms with rapid, appropriate plastic responses to environmental change will prevail over genotypes with fixed phenotypes. It is also accepted that the general dearth of organisms successful across a wide environmental range indicates fundamental limits to or costs of plasticity. The nature of constraining factors has been broadly discussed (DeWitt et al. 1998), and numerous studies have been done to quantify them. However, a curious pattern has emerged: although hypothesized to be widespread, costs are absent more often than they are detected. The issue of costs of plasticity (CoP) lies at the intersection of a range of evolutionary and ecological questions: What are the limits to plasticity? Are CoP associated with life history tradeoffs? Are CoP expected in all environments? Does plasticity enhance invasiveness? etc. This working group will address two fundamental questions. 1) Are the expectations that costs of plasticity should be universal well-founded (i.e., the “no free lunch” principle)? Several authors have proposed that, in situations where the intensity of selection for adaptive plasticity is strong, there should be corresponding pressure to ameliorate costs. 2) Independently of the answer to the first question, Are analytical and experimental methods for detecting CoP appropriate or sufficiently sensitive? CoP have most often been studied using common garden style plasticity experiments and analyzed via van Tienderen’s (1991) multiple regression approach.
Source: NESCent

February 10, 2015

22:00
Meta-analysis is a statistical technique used for syntheses of results from numerous independent studies. Increasingly, evolutionary biologists need to perform meta-analysis in which the effects of numerous explanatory variables on a response variable of interest are considered, taking into account the evolutionary history of the species in the dataset. However, such analyses require analysis of numerous complex statistical models, and methods for such analyses have not been previously developed. Our working group is developing these methods and applying them to understand local adaptation, context-dependency, and the influence of evolutionary relationships on outcomes of symbiosis between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.
Source: NESCent

January 27, 2015

02:59

Postdoc position in Evolutionary Genetics of Maternal Effects University of Zurich, Switzerland My group combines complementary approaches from evolutionary ecology, ecophysiology and genetics/genomics to understand the evolution and evolutionary consequences of prenatal maternal effects in different bird systems. Within this project, I have a postdoc position available to investigate the genetic basis of prenatal maternal investment using established, replicated Japanese quail selection lines for high and low maternal egg investment. Goal of the project is to identify genomic regions associated with differential maternal investment, and to link DNA sequence variation with the physiological and ecological phenotype of mothers from high and low investment lines. Thereby this project can provide an integrative understanding of the molecular and physiological architecture underlying variation in maternal reproductive strategies. The ideal candidate for this position has a strong interest in evolutionary biology, a can-do attitude and good writing and organisational skills. Given the large amount of data and the nature of the analyses involved (e.g. handling of SNP data, QTL mapping), expertise in evolutionary genetics, quantitative genetics, and/or bioinformatics is essential. The postdoc will be based at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies of the University of Zurich, providing ample opportunities for collaborations and interactions with researchers working in related and complementary fields (http://bit.ly/16PBvHf). The institute is very international and the working language is English. The position is funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation for the duration of 18 months (gross salary CHF / Euro 94’000 per annum). The ideal starting date is May 1st 2015, or as soon as possible afterwards. Applications should include 1) a cover letter outlining your motivation to work on this project, as well as relevant experience, 2) a detailed curriculum vitae, and 3) the contact details of three academic referees. Send the above as a single .pdf file to barbara.tschirren@ieu.uzh.ch Review of applications will start on February 26th 2015. For more information, feel free to contact me! Prof. Dr. Barbara Tschirren Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies University of Zurich Winterthurerstrasse 190 8057 Zurich – Switzerland Email: barbara.tschirren@ieu.uzh.ch http://bit.ly/1k3S5MS via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:34

—_000_2D41647E43D944469EDA6AE440D88006dukeedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Mitchell-Olds lab at Duke University seeks a highly motivated, detail-oriented assistant for field research in the northern Rocky Mountains, summer 2015. We are studying Boechera, a perennial herb that offers genetic tractability and ecological context. Current field experiments focus on questions related to local adaptation, plant defense against herbivory, and breeding systems. Our research sites are located in east-central Idaho. Base camp is a set of trailers located near the beautiful town of Salmon. Trailers include heat, hot water, a landline, and wireless internet access. Travel distances between sites are long, which necessitates many hours in the car. Our team usually returns to the trailers to sleep but applicants should be familiar with (and enjoy!) camping for the times when this is not feasible. Weather conditions in the Rockies can be severe, and assistants should expect to work in snow and rain as well as 90 degree temperatures. Regular (approximately monthly) trips are made to Missoula, Montana for groceries and other supplies. Successful applicants are expected to assist in data collection and data entry, plant care, transplanting, seed collection, and driving research vehicles. Applicants must be able to stoop/kneel for extended periods of time; hike up to 1 mile while carrying heavy loads; hike up and down steep hills; and dig or dibble holes in hard ground. The work can be physically demanding and tiring, and the research team usually collects data 5-6 days per week. A good sense of humor and a positive attitude are necessities! Qualifications: 1) some undergraduate education in biology, ecology, or related field, or equivalent experience; 2) experience camping and working outdoors and/or previous field research experience; 3) ability to perform repetitive tasks with a cheerful attitude and with attention to detail; 4) willingness to live and work in close proximity with other researchers in a trailer; 5) a current driver’s license. Previous experience working with plants is preferable but not required. Transportation, room with internet access, and salary will be provided. Applicants must be available throughout the field season from approximately June 1st through mid-August, but exact start and end dates are flexible. The deadline for applications is February 27th, 2015. Interested applicants should submit: 1) a short cover letter describing their qualifications as well as future academic and professional goals; 2) a rsum outlining previous work experience, relevant courses (completed or in progress), extracurricular activities; and 3) contact information of two character references. Email to: Rose Keith, rak24@duke.edu Program in Genetics and Genomics, Duke University —_000_2D41647E43D944469EDA6AE440D88006dukeedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The Mitchell-Olds lab at Duke University seeks a highly motivated, detail-oriented assistant for field research in the northern Rocky Mountains, summer 2015.  We are studying Boechera, a perennial herb that offers genetic tractability and ecological context. Current field experiments focus on questions related to local adaptation, plant defense against herbivory, and breeding systems. 

Our research sites are located in east-central Idaho. Base camp is a set of trailers located near the beautiful town of Salmon. Trailers include heat, hot water, a landline, and wireless internet access. Travel distances between sites are long, which necessitates many hours in the car. Our team usually returns to the trailers to sleep but applicants should be familiar with (and enjoy!) camping for the times when this is not feasible. Weather conditions in the Rockies can be severe, and assistants should expect to work in snow and rain as well as 90 degree temperatures. Regular (approximately monthly) trips are made to Missoula, Montana for groceries and other supplies.

Successful applicants are expected to assist in data collection and data entry, plant care, transplanting, seed collection, and driving research vehicles. Applicants must be able to stoop/kneel for extended periods of time; hike up to 1 mile while carrying heavy loads; hike up and down steep hills; and dig or dibble holes in hard ground. The work can be physically demanding and tiring, and the research team usually collects data 5-6 days per week. A good sense of humor and a positive attitude are necessities!

Qualifications: 1) some undergraduate education in biology, ecology, or related field, or equivalent experience; 2) experience camping and working outdoors and/or previous field research experience; 3) ability to perform repetitive tasks with a cheerful attitude and with attention to detail; 4) willingness to live and work in close proximity with other researchers in a trailer; 5) a current driver’s license. Previous experience working with plants is preferable but not required. Transportation, room with internet access, and salary will be provided. Applicants must be available throughout the field season from approximately June 1st through mid-August, but exact start and end dates are flexible.

The deadline for applications is February 27th, 2015. Interested applicants should submit: 1) a short cover letter describing their qualifications as well as future academic and professional goals; 2) a rsum outlining previous work experience, relevant courses (completed or in progress), extracurricular activities; and 3) contact information of two character references. 

Email to: 

Rose Keith, rak24@duke.edu Program in Genetics and Genomics, Duke University —_000_2D41647E43D944469EDA6AE440D88006dukeedu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:07

Central Michigan University is seeking undergraduate students to participate in a 10-week research experience at its Biological Station (CMUBS) on Beaver Island, Michigan. This program will provide funding for 5-7 undergraduates to work with CMU faculty on research projects related to the chemical, physical and biological aspects of the Lake Michigan nearshore shunt and its influence on nearshore-offshore coupling. Students will live and work on Beaver Island from June 1 V August 7, 2015, receiving a $4,000 stipend, together with free room and board and up to $500 for travel to Beaver Island and the CMU Biological Station. More information on the program and the online application are available at: http://bit.ly/18nMJdh. Applications, along with supporting materials, are due by Friday, February 27, 2015, with the final selection of participants expected by March 27, 2015. Questions can be directed to Jessica Lapp, coordinator of the Institute for Great Lakes Research, via email to jessica.lapp@cmich.edu or by phone to 989-774-4401. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:43
Postdoctoral position in Evolutionary Genomics Project description We are seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral researcher to join our ongoing ecological and evolutionary functional genomics (EEFG) research on a range of butterfly species. The research will be focused on 1) exploiting our extensive in-house population genomic data from 10 different Nymphalidae species, and 2) assembling and studying the genomes of 4 additional species in an analysis of gene family dynamics and ecological speciation. The principal goals of the project are to investigate the genetic basis of local adaptation and species differences in physiological performance (e.g. flight) and host-plant usage. We have developed sufficient in-house experience for genome assemblies and now we wish to start using these resources to address fundamental questions. From our perspective, an equally important goal of the position is that it will constitute an important step for the postdoctoral researcher towards securing a position as an independent researcher. Because of this, we encourage the postdoctoral researcher to design and pursue additional projects, to obtain experience in student supervision, and to develop his/her scientific network through collaborations and participation in scientific meetings. The Department of Zoology has an excellent history of studying butterfly ecology and evolution. The position will be in the lab of Christopher Wheat (see website ), which consists of 4 PhD students and 1 Postdoc. Currently we are primarily focused upon integrating our various studies of overwintering diapause, immune performance, and wing coloration with our genomic and transcriptomic data for the Pieris napi butterfly. Environment The position will be based at the Department of Zoology, in the division of Population Genetics, at Stockholm University. The Department hosts six research groups focused on butterfly ecology and evolution, which have a long history of fruitful collaboration. PI’s: Dr. Christopher Wheat, Dr. Karl Gotthard, Dr. Christer Wiklund, Dr. Sören Nylin, Dr. Niklas Janz and Dr. Bengt Karlsson We have extensive rearing facilities, recently renovated wet lab space, and extensive computational and genomic resources, provided in part by generous funding from the Wallenberg Foundation and the Swedish Research Council. The campus is located 4 metro stops from the center of Stockholm, which by many is regarded as one of the most beautiful capitals in the world and is home to a vibrant scientific community with several leading research institutes, including the Science for Life Laboratory (SLL) and the Swedish Museum of Natural History. The SLL is a leading genomics core facility that we routinely use. Eligibility and selection criteria The applicant must hold a PhD in biology or a related field, and the degree should have been received no more than three years before the deadline for applications. The ideal candidate is a creative and independent researcher that can work well in a team environment. A record of scientific achievement in computational genomics is essential, as is previous experience in handling NGS data using scripts and analysis pipelines. Experience with butterflies is not necessary, but documented experience with linux is required. Additional merits include experience in computer programming, population genetics and gene family dynamics. Terms of employment The position is for two years full-time. The start date of the position is flexible, but should ideally be before June 2015. Information For further questions regarding the position, please contact Dr. Christopher Wheat (chris.wheat@zoologi.su.se). Union representative Anqi Lindblom-Ahlm (Saco-S) and Lisbeth Häggberg (Fackförbundet ST), telephone: +46 8 16 20 00 (switchboard), and Gunnar Stenberg (SEKO), telephone: +46 70 316 43 41. Application Applicants should submit a CV including a publication list, and a cover letter describing their research interests, qualifications and reasons for applying. The cover letter should also indicate the applicant’s ideal starting date and a list of two persons who may provide references. Please submit the application as a single pdf document, marked with the reference number SU FV-0217-15, no later than March 1, 2015, by e-mail to registrator@su.se. Please state the reference number SU FV-0217-15 also in the subject line of your e-mail. Christopher Wheat via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:14
Dear all the Evolutionary biology meeting at marseilles web site is open again it was close due to an internet attack of the web site of the Marseille University . http://bit.ly/15fa2ML please Note that the early dead line is the end of january best regards Pierre Pierre PONTAROTTI via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:14
Heidelberg University, Centre for Organismal Studies Karlsruhe Institute of Technology 6 PhD scholarships within the research training group “Evolutionary novelty and adaptation – from molecules to organisms” Application deadline: 15.02.2015 The research training group is located at the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), Heidelberg University. It unites nine international research groups with complementary expertise in evolutionary biology, developmental biology, and ecology employing state-of-the-art molecular tools and imaging technology as well as field research in diverse habitats such as desert caves, coral reefs, and alpine systems. Research Program: The fellows will be educated and trained beyond existing boundaries and model organisms at ecological, genetic, and mechanistic levels of evolutionary biology. This broad education will allow the fellows to develop novel views that encompass contemporary concepts and future opportunities of the field. All projects offered represent a unique patch from the evolutionary past, which together unite different time scales of evolutionary research into one coherent education program. Outlines of available projects and participating groups are available on the webpage http://bit.ly/1BiE4Q8 Teaching Concept: Fellows will be trained in the collaborative research environment at COS, with a focus on organismal biology. All fellows will be integrated into the established PhD program under the umbrella of the prestigious Hoffmann-Berling International Graduate School (HBIGS) of the Heidelberg Life Sciences. Requirements: 
We invite applications from highly motivated candidates with above-average qualifications, passion for and experience in research, and the willingness to actively participate in the graduate school. Successful applicants will have (1) an Masters degree (or equivalent) in Biology or another relevant discipline, (2) a solid background in ecology / development and/or evolution, (3) an excellent command of the English language, and (4) a strong motivation to join an interdisciplinary and international research training environment. Applications
: Written applications, in English, should be submitted via HBIGS; applications for up to three projects are possible. They should include a CV including copies of all degrees, documentation of English proficiency, a motivation letter, and two letters of recommendation. Please refer to the HBIGS website for additional details (http://bit.ly/1uWpMIg). The motivation letter should include your statement-of-purpose why you would like to become a member of our graduate school and a short explanation for your project choice. Applicants are asked to submit the above-mentioned documents before February, 15th 2015. Interviews will take place in March, 2015 in Heidelberg. For questions regarding the graduate school please contact the spokesperson, Dr. Steffen Lemke (steffen.lemke@cos.uni-heidelberg.de) Steffen Lemke Group Leader Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Universität Heidelberg Im Neuenheimer Feld 230 69120 Heidelberg Germany phone +49 6221 54 5553 fax +49 6221 54 5639 email steffen.lemke@cos.uni-heidelberg.de Steffen Lemke via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:24
University of Bern, Switzerland: Field assistant bird evolution We are seeking one (1) enthusiastic field assistant interested in taking part in a field study in Bern, Switzerland. The field assistant will be part of the Evolutionary Ecology Lab (Institute of Ecology & Evolution, University of Bern, Switzerland). I am a post-doctoral research fellow at the Institute and will be conducting a field experiment that aims at quantifying the magnitude of phenotypic plasticity in sperm performance. We will be working on a natural population of great tits (Parus major) that breed in ca. 3-400 nest-boxes in forests surrounding the city of Bern. I will require one (1) field assistant that will help with all aspects of the work, including checking nest-boxes, ringing and taking measures of adult & offspring birds, catching adults, and more. The applicant should i) hold a BSc/Msc in Biology/Ecology or equivalent, ii) be independent and motivated: we work up to 12h/day and 7 days/week at peak periods, iii) be fluent in English (or in French), and iv) hold a valid European driving license. Bird handling experience would be an advantage. The study will start around mid-March 2015 and go on until mid-June 2015. Travel expenses and accommodation will be covered. Applications (letter + CV) should be sent to ‘s.losdat@gmail.com’. Applicants are welcome to contact me for any additional questions or details. Sylvain Losdat Post-doctoral research fellow Institute of Ecology & Evolution University of Berne Baltzerstrasse 6 3012 Bern Switzerland +447580056289 s.losdat@gmail.com Sylvain Losdat via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:24

*PhD position on “information use in an unpredictable environment - a case study on wild zebra finches”* We offer a PhD position on information use in the opportunistically breeding zebra finch, *Taeniopygia guttata*. In a combination of field and lab experiments in Australia, we will address unresolved key issues in information ecology linked to unpredictable environmental conditions. We seek a motivated PhD student with a strong background in Behavioural Ecology, Field Ecology, Information Ecology and/or Experimental Ecology. Some experience with hormonal analyses is advantageous. The 3-year position is funded by a grant of the German Science Foundation to Wiebke Schuett (PI) and Simon Griffith (Co-I). The PhD student will spend in total at least one year each in Germany (University of Hamburg) and Australia (Macquarie University & field). We also offer the PhD candidate the opportunity to apply for a PhD jointly awarded between the University of Hamburg and Macquarie University. Salary level is TV-L 13 (65%, ca. 1400-1600 EURO/m after deductions). The full ad can be found on: http://bit.ly/1JxWPVX Please apply by 16.2.2015. For further information please contact Wiebke Schuett (wiebke.schuett@uni-hamburg.de). Dr. Wiebke Schuett (PhD) Zoological Institute University of Hamburg Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3 20146 Hamburg Germany http://bit.ly/1tSEdKE wiebkesch@googlemail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR